Genealogy Groups Can Help With Your Family History Investigation Search

Ancestors Investigation Search

Due to the user-friendly information widely available through the Internet, people have become more interested in genealogy and their own family histories. Investigating family roots and building your own family tree have become popular hobbies, online.
Family history enthusiasts have found that they aren’t alone, online. Genealogy communities and groups have helped thousands of genealogists coming together for sharing tips and advice.

The online search for family history in the United States often leads the research to proceed in other countries from which their ancestors emigrated. Many Americans find that for them to complete their own family history chart, they must focus investigation searches in Italy, Ireland, Russia, England, Japan, and sometimes multiple countries.

To help with your international genealogy searches, there are several genealogy groups online for finding the documents and records you need. One good site to find an international community is WorldVitalRecords.com.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is well-known for continually investigating, collecting, and updating genealogy records. They can be accessed via their site FamilySearch.org for anyone looking for family history records.

And if you are looking for Jewish heritage records and databases, sites such as JewishGenealogySearch.com or JewishGen.com can help you in completing your family genealogy ancestry investigation search efforts.

Genealogy societies are also available for those who want to become part of a larger community. Through these societies, you can publish your own family history records, and get involved with organized conferences and events.

Societies such as the National Genealogy Society were created to help preserve genealogy records, as well as to provide training and education about ancestor search to their subscribers.

You can also become part of a community by joining popular commercial genealogy websites, like Archives.com, Genealogy.com, MyFamily.com, and Ancestry.com.

Find birth, death, marriage, divorce and historic vital records from one easy-to-use search interface!
Discover new connections to your family tree with cemetery listings, burial and military records, obituaries, surname histories, and more.
Great for people at all levels – whether you’re just starting out or have been doing genealogy for years!

Investigate and Search Now To Find Your Ancestors. Check Here our risk-free trial.

How To Find Your Distant Cousins / Living Relatives

How To Find Your Distant Cousins / Living Relatives 123 People Search

While building your family tree, the traditional genealogy research process normally begins by starting with yourself and your parents, and then gradually progressing generation by generation into the past. Then, when you hit a roadblock in that process, the best way to go ahead is by reversing the process, i.e. start seeking the present – and not pursuing the past.

Yep! Try looking for previously unknown living relatives / distant cousins.

How – you might ask? Well, death notices and newspaper obituaries usually include names of the deceased’s children and grandchildren, synagogue / church / mosque membership, place of burial. And official certificates of death often list place of burial and name a contact who may be a child of the deceased.

Be aware when your relative’s death occurred. If they’ve died early in the twentieth century, their children listed in the obituary as survivors are probably deceased themselves. You could try writing or sending an email to the cemeteries requesting more information, as they may be able to provide to you the name of the relative who purchased the burial plot and they may also give you the names of living descendants.

Your search for obituaries can be assisted on several different web sites. Recent deaths notices are available on Legacy.com, where you can search by US newspaper or the deceased’s name. Older death notices can be found through the Google News Archives site. And the US Library of Congress has a free searchable online database of hundreds of newspapers, starting in 1880.

Several online address and telephone directories may also give you data you’ll need to contact your newly discovered distant relatives (here at Investigations 123), and a Sample People Search Report is provided below.

Investigations 123 People Search Sample Report
Investigations 123 People Search Sample Report

Once you know your relatives’ names, professional networking sites such as LinkedIn.com and social networking sites such as Facebook.com will help you contacting them through their own internal messaging tools.

In searching for your living relative, you may have other clues that can help your search, such as hobbies or associations your distant cousin was involved with. You might start looking for possible associations through a directory such as www.asaecenter.org. Here you can enter keywords such as “carpenter” or “lawyer” and find potential associations for your relatives search. Happy hunting (from the comfort of your couch)!