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Free Trial Criminal Background Check

Free Trial Criminal Background Check

Conduct your preliminary Criminal Records Search, here…

Use Investigations 123′s Criminal Records Search to uncover everything that you can about someone’s past. Find out the details about a person’s criminal history and learn about their earlier offenses. You can even find out if some of your acquaintances have been convicted of a serious offense, in complete privacy, from the convenience of your own home.

National Criminal Records and Background Check Search Results consist of the following:

  • Arrest and convictions
  • Felonies and misdemeanor
  • Court and probation records
  • Mug shots
  • Criminal driving infractions
  • Sex offenders.

Do you know reasonably well your neighbors / friends / co-workers? It is not unusual to work and live among strangers in today’s world. But it doesn’t have to be this way. You see, due to the Federal Information Act, all U.S. citizens have access to public criminal records.

Criminal records are record accounts of all activities to be processed through the U.S. criminal justice and law enforcement bureaus. Thus, your criminal records search at our databases is for these specific public records. Criminal records are categorized by jurisdiction and type, and held at various jurisdictions to which they pertain (i.e. counties, states), as per the nature of the crime, locale, and other relating factors.

A criminal records search for criminal background information can be done on any person. Perhaps you are concerned about a new neighbor, a specific teacher at your child’s school, a new friend, or a more recent colleague at work. Whatever the reason is, you want to find out if they’ve been involved in any criminal activity, to protect your family or yourself from potential future harm. Consider that many sex offenders live unnoticed in family neighborhoods for years, while many will re-offend at some point in their lives after they’ve served time or penalty for their crime. Such criminals could be your neighbor next door, and you aren’t even aware of it. Many people don’t realize that it’s their right to search for this public criminal record information, and that it’s very easy, convenient, and confidential to conduct such searches.

How to Conduct a Criminal Records Search

Although lots of people consider a search for criminal records as expensive, time-consuming, and fraught with errors – that’s just not the case. Nowadays, it’s very accurate, convenient, and hassle-free process. With Investigations 123 com, you simply type in a full name and other variables, and an instant, comprehensive, accurate, up-to-date search is conducted to see if the person you are seeking has any criminal record in their history.

—>  Get your 5-day risk-free unlimited membership trial for Criminal Records / Background Checks, today.

criminal background check free trial

Get your Criminal Record 5-day Risk-Free Trial Report, Today. Check it here.



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Run Criminal Background Investigations and Get Criminal Records, Online

At Investigations123.com, you can run an instant background check report or select from a variety of other searches and reports to find just the information you are looking for. Your report may include any of the following information:

  • Felonies, Misdemeanors and Sex Offenses
  • National Arrest and Court Warrants
  • National Federal and State Tax Liens
  • National Federal and Civil Judgments
  • National Federal and State Bankruptcies
  • Distinguishing Bodily Marks
  • Roommates and Associates
  • Age / Date of Birth
  • Alias / Maiden Name
  • Possible Neighbors
  • Property Ownership
  • Marriages / Divorces Records
  • Death Index Check
  • Work Licenses

Our instant nationwide search system will check thousands of sources, proprietary search databases, and public databases and will let you download and view the records reports within minutes. You can get the report you are looking for easily and effortlessly right from the comfort of your own home. Our records are updated daily and new records are constantly being added to our system.

In addition to background checks, Investigations123.com offers phone number reports, employee checks, name search, reverse phone lookup searches, reverse cell phone search, criminal records, legal judgments, bankruptcies and liens, vital records, criminal files, police records, and property records, right on your screen.

If you choose to become a member of Investigations123.com via our special 5-day risk-free trial, you will enjoy:

  • Unrestricted access to search results
  • Unlimited people searches
  • Over 10 billion records at your fingertips
  • Instant lookups and accurate reports
  • Data directly from the sources
  • Fast and discreet investigative privileges

As a member, you will be able to take advantage of all available reports and searches.

ONLINE INVESTIGATIONS:

  • BACKGROUND RECORDS – Reports include addresses, relatives, phones, properties, judgments.
  • CRIMINAL RECORDS – Reports include case number, charge, offense, arrest, file, disposition, sentence.
  • LEGAL RECORDS – Reports include property, liens, judgments, business records, and more.
  • SSN RECORDS – Reports include Social Security Number validation and death records.
  • SEX OFFENDERS – Reports include registered addresses, aliases, case #, charge, conviction.
  • CREDIT RECORDS – Reports include subject’s credit history, credit worthiness, bankruptcies, and more.

CIVIL RECORDS:

  • BIRTH RECORDS – Reports include date, case, number, filings, parents, addresses.
  • DEATH RECORDS – Reports include date, case, number, filings, name, age, relatives.
  • DIVORCE RECORDS – Reports include filing type, date, case, location, name, age, properties.
  • MARRIAGE RECORDS – Reports include filing type, date, case, location, name, age, properties.
  • PROPERTY RECORDS – Reports include owner, location, transfers, sales, description, tax info.
  • BANKRUPTCY RECORDS – Reports include date, case, number, reason, legal files, addresses.

PEOPLE SEARCH:

  • PEOPLE SEARCH – Reports include people location and missing people information.
  • MISSING PERSONS – Reports include relatives, roommates, neighbors, aliases, address history.

REVERSE LOOKUP:

  • REVERSE PHONE – Reports include full addresses, names, contacts, account history.
  • REVERSE CELL PHONE – Reports include full addresses, names, contacts, account history.
  • REVERSE EMAIL – Reports include full addresses, names, contacts, account history.
  • REVERSE IP ADDRESS – Reports include hosting records, website owner records, addresses.

OTHER RECORDS:

  • BUSINESS RECORDS – Reports include business addresses, UCC filings, court rulings, and more.
  • NON-US RECORDS – Reports include limited records for Canada and United Kingdom.

MEMBER RESOURCES:

  • STATE RECORDS – Includes powerful search resources for every US state.
  • EBOOKS – Our proprietary information books on a huge variety of topics and categories

Start investigating today at Investigations123.com, by conducting a preliminary background check search or getting criminal records via our 5-day risk-free trial.

Criminal Background Screening

Get your Instant Criminal Background Check Report, Today. Check here.



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Benefits of Ordering a Background Check

Essentially, a background check report describes the process of using multiple sources for investigating and compiling a record on a person. This might include financial, criminal, or public records.

The results of an online background check report will normally include criminal history, a credit score, and employment verification.

Get your risk-free trial background check report.

Get your background check free trial, today.

Background Check Sources

These sources might include the following:

Criminal Records: this normally includes records relating to arrests, incarcerations, sex offenders, and other criminal records. Often, these reports are not as up-to-date as one might like, so the results of these online searches are not fully guaranteed.

The obvious alternative is to go directly to the state of choice, where such records will be more accurate (and probably less expensive). However, if you are looking for national information, going to a third party background checking company offering a free trial might be your best option.

Lawsuit records: potential employees who often file discrimination and other types of lawsuits may raise some red flags to employers. Because most of these lawsuits are public records, they can be searched by background check firms.

Education Records: these are often used to confirm if the job candidate did receive a degree or graduated from high school or college, as they claim.

Employment Records: these are used for verbal confirmations of past employment. Performance, accomplishments, activities, and relations with others are normally included.

Driving Records: employers that routinely hire drivers (especially of a company vehicle) seek people with clean driving records, i.e. with a history of no tickets or accidents any DUIs (driving under the influence) – unless they were a minor, at the time of the offence.

Financial records: credit scores, liens, property information, civil judgments, tax information, and bankruptcy.

Credit Reports: they are often requested for many potential employees, especially if the hiring company is a financial institution.
Furthermore, past bankruptcies, foreclosures and other financial information can be found in a credit report that might raise some red flags about the applicant.

Military Records: some employers want to know the details about the job applicant’s military resume.

Legal working status: the hiring of illegal workers is a concern for most employers, particularly if a sudden immigration raid occurs.

Other records: drug tests, litigation, licensing information, medical, mental, as well as physiological evaluations.

Reasons For a Background Check

An employment background check is the process of compiling any job candidate’s records for the purpose of evaluating behavioral history and employment. Background checks are normally conducted for confirming information. These routine checks are often used by employers as a means of objectively evaluating a candidate’s qualifications, character, fitness, and to identify potential hiring risks for safety and security reasons. These background checks can ensure safety for employees and prevent future problems in the workplace.

Background checks are often conducted on information included on an employment resume or application. Sometimes, these background checks reveal different information than what the job candidate provided to the employer.

Another reason might be to differentiate further between job candidates. For example, if you’ve got two equally qualified individuals, the fact that a background check on one of them revealed a felony such candidate did not disclose, might cause the selection of the other candidate.

Furthermore, some background checks are prescribed by law. For example, if you work with kids as a teacher or tutor, a criminal background check will be conducted (including sex offender status).

Background checks are also conducted for investigating thoroughly a potential military personnel, government employee,  or any one who will work with a government agency. The purpose is to grant a security clearance for such candidate. Background checks are always required for job positions that require trust or high security, e.g. in a daycare, hospital, court of law, school, financial institution, airport, or government.

Being offered a specific job might depend on the information revealed in your background check report. Thus, existing employees, volunteers, and job applicants may be asked to submit to comprehensive background checks.

When performing a background check, some of the sources that will release your information are educational institutions, government agencies, criminal and civil courts, and past employers.



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Conduct a Background Check on Prospective Tenants / Renters (risk-free trial)

Criminal Background Screening

Get your Instant Criminal Background Check Report, Today. Check here.

In both commercial and residential leases, there is always the risk of lost income resulting if a tenant breaks a lease and suddenly vacates, or from the elapsed time for completing extensive repairs during which the property can’t be leased. These are nightmare risk scenarios that can be minimized by conducting background checks before renting an apartment, condo, home or commercial space to a prospective tenant.

The steps presented here will dramatically reduce the risks of facing at a later stage, either tenant evictions or costly repairs.

You can run a Tenant Background Check online right now, by simply conducting a search in our vast network of Public Records and Proprietary Databases, here. You’ll get top quality search results about your prospective tenants within minutes.

The implementation of a tenant screening process will reduce future problems with your tenant.

By checking on the background of a potential renter here at Investigations123.com, and thereby establishing the profile of your prospective tenant, the risks of experiencing the scenarios referred above become much lower.

The first contact with a prospective tenant takes place very often by telephone, particularly if the property to be rented has been advertised in a local newspaper. This is the right time for the property owner (or manager) to start asking the right questions towards the qualification process.

Commercial or residential renters should be questioned about the following issues:

  1. Name of prospective tenant
  2. Telephone contact number
  3. Date that the prospective tenant wishes to occupy property
  4. Does the prospective renter have previous landlord references?

The landlord (or manager) should also inform the prospective tenant of the monthly rent, security deposit or other up-front charges (if applicable), as this often will end the need for further screening if the person can’t afford the rent being quoted.

If both parties are happy with the initial telephone interview, the prospective tenant will certainly like to go and see the property. This also gives the owner / manager with the opportunity to meet the prospective renter in person.

The Rental Application Form should include the following information:

  1. Full name of applicant, social security number, date of birth and current address
  2. Applicant’s addresses for the past 10 years
  3. Landlords’ names for the past 10 years (if rented during such period)
  4. Applicant’s trade / professional licenses (not required for residential space rentals)
  5. Applicant’s current job and annual salary
  6. Applicant’s job description or entrepreneurial occupation
  7. Applicant’s past employment for past 5 years
  8. Applicant’s highest level of academic education
  9. Credit references and bankruptcy issues
  10. Misdemeanor or felonies (criminal) records for prospective tenant
  11. Full names for all occupants / co-renters
  12. Two personal references, with full addresses and telephone numbers
  13. Next-of-kin, i.e. name of a relative not living with tenant, with full address and telephone number
  14. Driver’s license number and state of issue
  15. Vehicle and license plate number

All such information provided by the prospective tenant should then be confirmed by the use of the database people search provided by Investigations123.com, here.

Past landlords and personal references are very important sources of information about the prospective tenant and his/her previous relationship with personal property. You can ask them for how long they’ve known the applicant and if they consider him/her reliable, their relationship with neighbors, any noise he/she (or pets) may have made that disturbed neighbors and whether the rented property was left in good condition, in the recent past.

If the applicant is self-employed / business owner, you should ask copies of the latest business banking statement and tax filings for the previous year. Then, you can also run a business background check, to confirm the prospective tenant’s credit worthiness.

The signed application should include a Release of Information Statement, which will enable you to check the tenant’s background for ascertaining if he/she has been truthful in answering all questions.

This last check is critical for determining the overall characteristics of a potential tenant. Furthermore, a comprehensive person background check will also determine his/her financial stability.

If a decision is made to deny rental, his/her application together with information gathered through the screening conducted here, at Investigations123.com must be disclosed to the prospective tenant as the reason for denial.

When searching the various databases available at Investigations123.com, keep in mind that earlier addresses, landlords, and roommates are often revealed in your Tenant Background Check search.

You can run a Tenant Background Check online now, by simply conducting a search in our vast network of Public Records and Proprietary Databases, here.  You’ll get top quality search results about your prospective tenants within minutes, via our 5-day risk-free trial.

A sample report for a Comprehensive Background Report is provided below.

Comprehensive Criminal Background Check Sample Report

Comprehensive Criminal Background Sample Report



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Criminal Background Checks For Employment / Job Screening Purposes (risk-free trial)

Recently, criminal background checks became a key part of the job screening process, both to exclude unsuitable (or even dangerous) employees, as well as to help in hiring the best possible candidate. But the whole procedure of obtaining a proper background check is full of shortcomings that vary in each state and/or county.

The optimal background check should be precise, comprehensive, consistent, instant (when obtained online) and, of course, legal.

Coordinating all these factors is normally very time-consuming, and the work performed differs in accordance with the location of the job applicant and where he/she has lived in the past.

As a result of the fact that the whole background check screening process is unregulated, employers that don’t know how to test a proper screening process may end up with a criminal background report that is both inaccurate, and incomplete.

Most employers routinely conduct background checks on job applicants as part of the hiring process.

Increased usage of criminal background checks by employers to pre-qualify job applicants arises from the growth of legal claims suggesting that an employer was negligent in hiring an employee who later engaged in workplace violence or some other act that might result in theft of company’s property or sexual assault to a colleague at work.

The fact that negligent hiring is so common (particularly amongst smaller organizations with fewer resources) greatly increases an employer’s exposure for large damages claims, making the use of criminal background checks a great defense to liability, in case violence might occur in the workplace.

Furthermore, many organizations are also conducting criminal background checks on current employees, either on a routine basis or prior to a transfer, promotion or any change in the terms and conditions of employment.

Employers utilizing  background checks for employment purposes must adhere to a number of legal requirements before they can use a criminal background check on an employee or job applicant.

Prior to obtaining a background check, the employer must make a very clear written disclosure to the job applicant that a background check may be obtained, and such disclosure can’t be incorporated into an employment application.

The employer must also get the written authorization of the job applicant to ask the background check report. However, an employer is entitled to refuse hiring any applicant who won’t complete such written authorization.

What’s Included in a Criminal Background Check?

The restrictions on an employer considering criminal histories for employment purposes are driven primarily by state law.

The state law restrictions on the use of criminal background check information for employment purposes are as diverse as the number of states in the USA.

The federal and state enforcement agencies seem to be balancing the proven effectiveness of utilizing background check information in making hiring decisions against the potential for a disparate impact on minorities.

Furthermore, arrest records are subject to the principle of innocent until proven guilty, whereas conviction records, by definition, are adjudications of guilt. Thus, the state agencies favor employment decisions based on criminal convictions (and not arrest records) because the offense has been objectively confirmed. As a result, employers are on much safer grounds relying exclusively on criminal convictions when making hiring decisions.

A comprehensive criminal background check involves accessing many sources of information.

The federal database doesn’t contain date of birth or Social Security Number (SSN) information, making an exact match difficult for individuals with common names. Date of birth and full name are the most common identifiers, but driver’s license numbers and SSN may be retrieved as well.

Because common names may pull up records for a number of different individuals, it’s important that employers ask job applicants to provide full names (including middle), maiden names and any other names used in the past. For the same reason, job applicants should provide home addresses going back as many years as will be searched.

Counties are the source of criminal information, and therefore, they generally have the most comprehensive criminal background information.

County records generally contain information about felonies, misdemeanors, infractions, and traffic violations in addition to arrests.

Such records are available to the public and generally go back at least twenty years, but it’s unlawful for employers to use all such information (e.g. arrest records) in the job screening process.

Depending on the county, a search may be performed online or in person, either by a court clerk or a private individual.

State databases of criminal information are compiled from the underlying county criminal background history data. Thus, state databases rely on local jurisdictions to report criminal information. And such reporting can be infrequent or inconsistent, and not all levels of offenses are reported.

State law determines what types of records will be transmitted from the counties to the state criminal databases. Such records include felonies, misdemeanors, infractions, traffic violations, arrests, cases without disposition, expunged records, and even juvenile records.

As with county courthouses, searches may be performed online or in person, depending on the state.

Unlike county records, which are in the public domain, states own and keep up their own criminal databases, and state laws may restrict access to various types of records. The entire criminal history is available based on information that is considered publicly accessible pursuant to that state’s laws.

Premium databases: these are privately owned databases of criminal background information maintained by companies such as Investigations123.com and made available online to users via an initial risk-free trial.

Thus, there is no such thing as a one-stop comprehensive source (i.e., an all-inclusive national database) for criminal background information, as there are many sources – some are public, others private.

Criminal background screening for employment purposes should not be conducted lightly. Background check screening is a process that implicates a broad variety of privacy and safety concerns that people attribute great value.

Ideally, employers who seek criminal background check information want to be able to make informed decisions about whether a job applicant will contribute to a safe and productive workplace or potentially will cause some harm to a colleague or company’s property, if eventually employed.

Investigations123.com is not a consumer reporting agency as defined under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”), and the information in the databases has not been collected in whole or in part for the purpose of furnishing consumer reports, as defined in the FCRA – which includes Criminal Background Check Reports.

Criminal Background Screening Report

Get your Instant Criminal Background Check Report, Today. Check it here.

For a criminal background check sample report, click here.



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Babysitter and Nanny Background Check Free Trial Search Service

Background checks are searches through registries, databases, and other public and private sources.
While they are not always fully accurate or complete, background checks can be extremely helpful when making a hiring decision, because they can uncover potential warning signs about caregiver candidates.
Whether you’re looking for a babysitter, nanny, senior care provider, housekeeper, tutor, pet sitter, or a dog walker, a background check can help reveal things such as driving infractions or criminal conduct.

Requesting background checks is a key step in finding quality caregivers. In fact, virtually everybody seeking to hire a caregiver / sitter do request a background check because it can reveal information that wouldn’t come up during reference checking or in-depth interviews.
When you’re close to making a hiring decision – or even before you invite someone to your house for a caregiver/nanny interview (see checklist, here) - you should request a background check, online.

We make requesting background checks as easy as they are important. Start by selecting a promising caregiver, and then post a job, so that qualified caregivers can come to you, or simply search caregivers for nearby help.

Found a good sitter / caregiver candidate? Now it’s time to run a background check! You’re ready to make a more informed decision in your caregiver search! Now that you know how background checks work, why not have them work for you?

Request a background check for a caregiver you’re considering via our risk-free trial, here.

Unlimited people search reports for nannies / babysitters.

Unlimited background check free trial for screening a babysitter / nanny / housekeeper BEFORE you hire her.

A background check free trial sample report for nannies / babysitters is provided below.

Comprehensive Background Investigation

Comprehensive Background Check Sample Report. Click here and order your risk-free unlimited membership trial for nannies and babysitters.



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Background Check Sample Search Results Screenshots

Below is only a small selection of sample partial screenshots for several public records searches at Investigations 123 People Search.

Your specific search will include fields dependent on your particular look-up category and subject.

Each report is normally priced separately. However, our 5-day risk-free trial for “first time” customers will provide you with an unlimited membership. Check it here.

Images below are provided for illustration purposes only, since every report is different and our sources are constantly being updated, improved and expanded.

Criminal Records History Sample Report

 

Criminal History Sample Investigation Report

Criminal Records History Sample Investigations 123 Report

People Search Sample Report

 

People Search Sample Investigation Report

People Search Sample Investigations 123 Report

Comprehensive Background Check Sample Report

Comprehensive Background Check / Investigation

Comprehensive Background Check Sample Investigations 123 Report

Reverse Phone / Cell Phone Sample Report

 

Reverse Phone Lookup Search Investigations 123 Report

Search Warrant Sample Report

 

Warrant Report Sample Investigation Report

Search Warrant Sample Investigations 123 Report

Birth Records Sample Report

 

Birth Records Sample Investigation Report

Birth Records Sample Investigations 123 Report

Bankruptcy Sample Report

 

Bankruptcy Sample Investigation Report

Bankruptcy Sample Investigations 123 Report

Court Case Sample Report

 

Court Case Sample Investigation Report

Court Case Sample Investigations 123 Report

Business Search Sample Report

 

Business Search Sample Investigation Report

Business Search Sample Investigations 123 Report


You are only a few easy steps away from investigating the truth about someone’s background! With over 1 billion records, our instant nationwide search system allows for unlimited look ups and accesses data from multiple databases to compile the most comprehensive reports available. And our Background Check Report Search combines a multitude of various records such as civil judgments, bankruptcies, liens, court cases, search warrants, as well as federal / criminal records to provide you with a Comprehensive Background Checks Records Report. And please select our 5-day risk-free trial, here!

Click here for a slideshow of Investigations 123 com Sample Search Results Screenshots Reports.



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Access Public Records and Run Background Checks / Criminal Records from Your Own Home

Investigations123.com, a trusted and recognized online records information search and retrieval provider, lets you use a network of multiple data sources to find the exact records you are looking for. Get the data from thousands of sources, private and public, conveniently and quickly right to your screen. 

Investigations123.com provides a discreet and fast way for you to find records with direct online data retrieval. Your search will include fields dependant on your particular lookup subject-matter and category.

Your Public / Criminal Records Search Results may include:

  • Full Court Records Check:  Criminal and Courthouse Files
  • 20 Year Address History with Phone Numbers and Details
  • Court Warrants and National Arrest
  • National Federal and State Tax Liens
  • National Federal and Civil Judgments
  • National Federal and State Bankruptcies
  • Distinguishing Bodily Marks
  • List of Relatives with Addresses
  • Roommates and Associates
  • Age / Date of Birth
  • Alias / Maiden Name
  • Possible Neighbors
  • Property Ownership
  • Marriages / Divorces
  • Death Index Check
  • Work Licenses

With your 5-day risk-free unlimited membership trial, Investigations123.com will give you unlimited access to records of all types.

And wouldn’t it be convenient for you to be able to check a potential employee’s driving records before you hire them? 
Investigations123.com will allow you to get access to such information, including DUI’s, DWI’s, drunk driving offenses, and reverse license plate lookup. 

And isn’t it important for you to make sure that the babysitter you’ve recently hired for your child is who he / she says they are?  Investigations123.com allows you to feel comfortable with your nanny by giving you the ability to run instant background checks, criminal records, bankruptcy reports, and public / court records.

And wouldn’t you like to know a little more about that guy that gave you his number at the disco last night before you call him up?  Access the reverse phone lookup system at Investigations123.com and find out more using a landline, cell phone, or email address.

Practically anything is available about anyone, except for the very sensitive personal information such as credit card and financial data. Other than that, you might be able to discover a lot of data about mostly anyone. Social Security numbers are among the sensitive personal information that is generally not available. It’s a vital security precaution not to allow Social Security numbers be available in premium databases such as the ones we provide.

You’ll be able to lookup information about people in the United States, Canada, and United Kingdom – we have the most databases and data centers available for these 3 (three) countries. And we also have a fewer number of options for people living elsewhere in the world. 

Please sign-up for unrestricted access via our 5-day risk-free trial, today [link below].
You, too, can be putting your knowledge to good use that might just save you or your family from an uncomfortable situation. Get peace of mind by becoming knowledgable about your acquaintances.

[Below is provided a sample of a background check report, for illustration purposes only].

Comprehensive Criminal Background Check

Sample Background Check Report



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Before You Sell Your Next Car: Here’s What You Need to Know About How to Do a Background Investigation.

Are you in the business of selling new or used vehicles? If so, you probably know the ins and outs of how to sell cars, how to appeal to someone’s needs, and even the importance of marketing your company. Salespeople normally receive a commission for each car they sell, and the company makes a profit from each vehicle being sold.

But what if the person you sell the car to doesn’t honor its commitments in terms of monthly installments, though? Here’s something you need to know before you sell your next vehicle.

Lots of car companies check the credit worthiness of those they sell the cars to. However, smaller car companies don’t always do it. You’ll see this often in smaller towns or rural areas. However, when you lose money on a vehicle that someone doesn’t pay for, your company is at risk. Then, you’ll have to pay fees to someone for having the vehicle repossessed, if you can find it.

In order to save yourself from this kind of trouble, it’s a good idea to check the credit worthiness of your applicants. You may also want to check other issues as well, such as whether (or not) they’ve had any other court judgments against them, or if they have a criminal background. If you sell a car to someone who is irresponsible enough to have committed a crime, or even several, do you think they’re gonna be responsible enough to make the car payments to your business? If they have several court judgments against them, and have been irresponsible enough to go into debt with other payments, do you think they’re gonna be responsible enough to make the car payments to your business?

By simply entering a name into Investigations123.com’ search box provided on our homepage, you can find out the information you need to make sure that your next car sale will be a complete success. When you enter the name, you wait a few seconds and then you’ll have access about criminal background records, civil background records, and even whether (or not) they’ve already filed for bankruptcy. Obviously, if they had several court judgments against them or if they’ve already filed for bankruptcy in the recent past, you may wish to reconsider selling the car to your new customer.

In the car business, you really need to be certain your customers are going be able to make the monthly installments and be reliable. Using the credit information provided by Investigations123.com, you can be sure that your next sale is gonna be a success all the way through.

Criminal Background Screening

Get your Instant Criminal Background Check Report, Today. Check it here for your risk-free trial.



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Criminal Background Checks for Prospective Foster / Adoptive Parents: Summary of US State Laws

All US States, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and Puerto Rico have statutes or regulations requiring background investigations of prospective foster and adoptive parents and all adults residing in their households.

In most US states, the background investigation includes a check of Federal and State criminal records.

Most US states also require checks of child abuse and neglect registries. States may deny approval of a foster care license or adoption application if any adult in the household has been convicted of certain crimes, such as sexual abuse of a minor.

A background investigation refers to information collected by the child-placing agency to determine the suitability of the prospective foster or adoptive family.
A criminal record check refers specifically to a check of the individual’s name in State, local, or Federal law enforcement records for any history of criminal convictions.

Federal Requirements

State statutes requiring criminal background checks are supported by Federal legislation in title IV-E of the Social Security Act. The Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) of 1997 amended title IV-E to require criminal record checks of any prospective foster or adoptive parent to whom foster care maintenance payments or adoption assistance payments are to be made under title IV-E.

The Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 further amended title IV-E to require a fingerprint-based check of a national crime information database before any prospective foster or adoptive parent may be approved for placement of a child, whether or not foster care maintenance payments or adoption assistance payments are to be made on behalf of the child.

Under title IV-E, approval of the foster or adoptive home may not be granted if either of the following criminal records is found:

  • The applicant has ever been convicted of felony child abuse or neglect; spousal abuse; a crime against children (including child pornography); or a crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide but not including other types of physical assault or battery.
  • The applicant has been convicted of a felony for physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense within the past 5 years.

The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA), as amended in June 2003, extends the requirement for criminal background checks to all adults residing in prospective foster or adoptive family households.

The Adam Walsh Act also requires a check of State child abuse and neglect registry(s) for all adults living in prospective foster and adoptive homes. These checks must be conducted in every State in which each individual lived during the previous 5 years.

State Requirements for Prospective Foster Parents

All US states require a criminal record check as part of the background investigation that is conducted when an individual applies for licensure as a foster parent. Requirements for the types of background checks and the individuals who are subject to the checks may be found in statute or regulation.

State or local criminal record checks of a foster parent applicant are required in all US states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.
Federal criminal record checks also are required in approximately  38 States [the word approximately is used to stress the fact that US states frequently amend their laws. This information is current through August 2009].

In addition to name-based checks, fingerprinting is required as part of a criminal record check in 39 States.

Child abuse and neglect record checks are required in 40 States, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico.

Regulations (administrative law, rules, or policy) are issued by State agencies. Statutes are laws enacted by State legislatures.

An application for foster parent licensure may be rejected when a check reveals that a prospective foster parent or other household member has been convicted of a crime that would raise concerns about the family’s ability to provide a safe and stable home environment for the child.

Disqualifying Crimes
Approximately 22 States and the District of Columbia will disqualify an applicant if he or she or any household member has ever been convicted of felony child abuse or neglect, spousal abuse, a crime against children (including child pornography), or a crime of violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide; or has been convicted of physical assault or battery or a drug-related offense within the past 5 years.

In most States, other crimes, including any crime of violence, arson, kidnapping, illegal use of weapons or explosives, fraud, forgery; or property crimes such as burglary and robbery may lead to disqualification.

In 31 States, an applicant may be disqualified if he or she has a registry record of substantiated or founded child abuse or neglect.

State Requirements for Prospective Adoptive Parents
Nearly all US states require a criminal record check as part of a background investigation for approving an adoptive placement. In most US states, requirements for adoptive parents are similar to those for foster parents, although specifics may vary. An example of this is the requirement to check the State’s sex offender registry: Alaska requires checks for adoptive parents but not foster parents; Iowa and Nebraska require checks for foster parents but not adoptive parents. All three States examine conviction records for sex offenses for both foster and adoptive parents.
Requirements for the types of background checks and the individuals who must be included in the checks may be found in statute or regulation. These include the following:
State or local criminal record checks of an adoptive parent applicant are required in approximately 48 States, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico.

Child abuse and neglect record checks are required in 38 States, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico.

Checks of State sex offender registries are required in Alaska, Illinois, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Puerto Rico.
Criminal record checks are required for all adult members of prospective adoptive parents’ households in approximately 32 States and the District of Columbia.

Criminal record checks are required for all adults and older children in prospective adoptive parents’ households in six States.
Criminal record checks are required for all household members, regardless of age, in Idaho and Montana.
Information in criminal background histories and child abuse reports is incorporated into the adoption home study that is used to help determine whether an adoptive parent’s home will be safe and appropriate for placement of a child. An unfavorable home study may be issued and the adoption petition may be denied when a check reveals that the prospective adoptive parent or another household member has been convicted of a crime that would raise concerns about that family’s ability to provide a safe home for a child.

Disqualifying Crimes
Approximately 18 States and the District of Columbia will disqualify a prospective adoptive parent if he or she or any household member has ever been convicted of felony child abuse or neglect, spousal abuse, a crime against children (including child pornography), or a crime of violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide; or has been convicted of physical assault or battery or a drug-related offense within the past 5 years.20 In some States, other crimes, including any crime of violence, arson, kidnapping, illegal use of weapons or explosives, fraud, forgery, or property crimes such as burglary and robbery may lead to disqualification.

In approximately 23 States and Puerto Rico, a prospective adoptive parent may not be approved if he or she has a registry record of substantiated or founded child abuse or neglect.

Alabama
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based criminal history background information check is required for current and prospective foster parents and all adult household members.
A criminal history background information check will not be conducted on a current foster parent or household member of a foster family if an FBI and State criminal history background information check has already been conducted under other law.
Convictions for any of the following crimes shall make an individual unsuitable for licensure:
Murder, manslaughter, or criminally negligent homicide
A sex crime
A crime that involves the physical or mental injury or maltreatment of a child, the elderly, or an individual with disabilities
A crime committed against a child
A crime involving the sale or distribution of a controlled substance
Robbery
A crime or offense committed in another State or under Federal law that would constitute any of the above crimes in this State
Conviction for any crime listed in the Adoption and Safe Families Act, shall disqualify a person from being approved or continuing to be approved as a foster parent or adoptive parent, and a convicted person shall be deemed unsuitable for employment, volunteer work, approval, or licensure as a foster parent or adoptive parent.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A fingerprint-based criminal history background check is required for applicants and members of their household age 19 and older as part of the adoption investigation.
A criminal history background information check will not be conducted for a current adoptive parent or household member if an FBI and State criminal history background information check has already been conducted under other law.
No home can be approved where any adult member has been convicted of a crime at any time involving:
A sex-related crime, including sexual abuse, exploitation, rape, child pornography, or incest
Serious intentional physical injury or death of any person, including murder, manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment, or kidnapping
A crime against a child, including abandonment or endangerment
A property crime, such as burglary or robbery
Arson
Manufacture, sale, distribution, use, or possession of controlled substances
An exception is allowed when a household member has a criminal conviction involving robbery, burglary, or arson when there is evidence of rehabilitation.
When a household member has a criminal conviction for a sex-related crime; serious intentional or negligent physical injury or death of any person; a crime against a child; or the manufacture, sale, distribution, use, or possession of controlled substances, an exception is made if there is evidence of rehabilitation and the following conditions exist:
For a felony, 10 years have elapsed since the sentence was served.
For a misdemeanor, 5 years have elapsed since the sentence was served.
No exception is allowed when there is a criminal conviction involving a sex-related crime against a child, serious intentional reckless or negligent physical injury, or death of a child.

Alaska
Requirements for Foster Parents
The applicant must request a criminal history check, or provide proof of a valid fingerprint-based criminal history check, for each individual to be associated with the applicant. This requirement applies to all individuals age 16 or older who are not recipients of services and who wish to reside with the applicant. This requirement applies to each individual who, on or before April 10, 2007:
Does not have a valid criminal history check
Passed a criminal history check conducted before February 9, 2007, that was not fingerprint-based or was fingerprint-based and conducted more than 6 years before February 9, 2007
An application for licensure will not be approved if:
The applicant’s name appears on the centralized registry.
The applicant has a physical health problem or behavioral health problem that poses a significant risk to the health, safety, or well-being of children.
The applicant was the subject of prior adverse licensing action.
The individual has been convicted of any of the barrier crimes listed in 7 AAC 10.905.
In addition to the criminal history check, the department will review its child protection records and previous licensing records with respect to the applicant.
For the purpose of determining whether the home of a relative meets the requirements for placement of a child, the department shall conduct a criminal background check from State and national criminal justice information available under ch. 12.62. The department may conduct a fingerprint background check on any member of the relative’s household who is age 16 or older when the relative requests placement of the child.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
This issue is not addressed in statute. The following information is from the Alaska Administrative Code.
An agency shall conduct a home study for all applicants in the family being considered as an adoptive or guardianship home by the agency. The agency shall obtain the results of a check for a history of abuse, violence, or criminal background for all adults living in the home, and an evaluation shall be made of the suitability of the home in light of any finding of such history.
Except when placing a child under emergency conditions, an adoption or guardianship home may not be approved if a person in the prospective adoption or guardianship home has a disqualification described in 7 AAC 56.210(b). An individual may be disqualified if:
The individual’s name appears on the centralized registry of child abuse and neglect.
The individual has a physical health problem or behavioral health problem that poses a significant risk to the health, safety, or well-being of children.
The individual was the subject of prior adverse licensing action.
The agency shall review the Alaska Sexual Offender Registry before placement of a child and shall make a check of local court records before placement or on the first day that the court is open following the placement of a child.
An agency shall request a State and Federal report of criminal history record information for each adult member of an applicant’s household. The individual may be disqualified if he or she has been convicted of a barrier crime, as described in 7 AAC 10.905.

American Samoa
Requirements for Foster Parents
Criminal background and registry checks are not addressed in statute or in regulation.
Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Criminal background and registry checks are not addressed in statute or in regulation.

Arizona
Requirements for Foster Parents
The division shall not issue a license unless each foster parent and each other adult member of the household has a valid fingerprint clearance card issued.

The foster parent and each adult member of the household must certify on forms provided by the division and notarized whether the foster parent or other adult members of the household are awaiting trial or have ever been convicted of any criminal offenses, including:
Sexual abuse, exploitation, or molestation of a child or vulnerable adult
Incest
Homicide, including murder, manslaughter, and negligent homicide
Sexual assault
Child prostitution
Child abuse or felony child neglect
Sexual conduct with a minor
Dangerous crimes against children
Exploitation of minors involving drug offenses
Taking a child for the purpose of prostitution
Abuse or neglect of a vulnerable adult
Production, publication, sale, possession, and presentation of obscene items
Furnishing harmful items to minors
Furnishing harmful items to minors by Internet activity
Obscene or indecent telephone communications to minors for commercial purposes
Pandering
Transporting persons for the purpose of prostitution, polygamy, and concubinage
Any felony offense involving contributing to the delinquency of a minor
Unlawful sale or purchase of children
Child bigamy
Any felony offense involving domestic violence
Felony drug or alcohol-related offenses if committed within the last 5 years
Felony indecent exposure
Terrorism

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A fingerprint-based Federal and State criminal records check is required for a prospective adoptive parent and any adult household members, except a birth or legal parent with custody of the child, as part of the investigation for preadoption certification.
The prospective adoptive parent must certify on forms that are provided by the division and notarized whether the prospective adoptive parent is awaiting trial on or has ever been convicted of any criminal offenses listed above in this State or similar offenses in another State or jurisdiction.
A central registry records check, including any history of child welfare referrals, is required for a prospective adoptive parent and each adult who is living permanently with the prospective adoptive parent as part of the court’s social study.

Arkansas
Requirements for Foster Parents
A foster parent and all household members age 10 and older, excluding children in foster care, shall be checked with the child maltreatment central registry in his or her State of residence and any State of residence in which the person has lived for the past 6 years.
A child in the custody of the Department of Human Services shall not be placed in the home of any foster parent unless all household members age 18 and older, excluding children in foster care, have been checked with the Identification Bureau of the Department of Arkansas State Police for convictions of the offenses listed below. In addition, a fingerprint-based criminal background check performed by the FBI in compliance with Federal law and regulation is required.
No foster child in the custody of the Department of Human Services shall be placed in the home of any foster parent if the criminal records check reveals a felony conviction for:
Child abuse or neglect
Spousal abuse
A crime against children, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including other physical assault or battery
Physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense if the offense was committed within the past 5 years
Because of the serious nature of the offenses and the close relationship to the type of work that is to be performed, the following shall result in permanent disqualification:
Capital murder or first- and second-degree murder
Kidnapping
Rape
First- or second-degree sexual assault
Endangering the welfare of a minor in the first degree or second degree
Incest
Arson
Endangering the welfare of an incompetent person
Felony adult abuse

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The adoption home study shall include a State-of-residence criminal background check, if available, and national fingerprint-based criminal background check performed by the FBI on the adoptive parents and all household members age 18 and older, excluding children in foster care.
If a prospective adoptive parent has lived in a State for at least 6 years immediately prior to adoption, then only a State-of-residence criminal background check shall be required.
If the Department of Human Services has responsibility for the child to be adopted, the home study shall include a national fingerprint-based criminal background check performed by the FBI on the prospective adoptive parents and all household members age 18 or older, excluding children in foster care.
A child maltreatment central registry check shall be required for all household members age 10 and older, excluding children in foster care, as a part of the home study, if such a registry is available in their State of residence.
Additional national fingerprint-based criminal background checks performed by the FBI are not required for international adoptions as they are already a part of the requirements for adoption of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Citizenship and Immigration Services.
No foster child in the custody of the department shall be placed in the home of any adoptive parent if the criminal records check reveals a felony conviction for:
Child abuse or neglect
Spousal abuse
A crime against children, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including other physical assault or battery
Physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense if the offense was committed within the past 5 years
Any person who is found guilty of a criminal offense shall be excluded as an adoptive parent.

California
Requirements for Foster Parents
Fingerprint identifications and FBI and State criminal records checks are required for a prospective foster parent and any person, other than a client, residing in the residence.
The department shall determine whether the applicant or any adult member of the applicant’s household has ever been convicted of a crime other than a minor traffic violation or arrested for any crime for which the department cannot grant an exemption if the person was convicted and has not been exonerated. These offenses include:
Offenses for which a person must register with the sex offender registry, including kidnapping, rape, sodomy, sexual battery, child pornography, and child sexual exploitation
Assault with a deadly weapon
Infliction of injury on a present or former spouse or cohabitant or parent of a child
Endangering a child or causing or permitting a child to suffer physical pain, mental suffering, or injury
Prior to granting a license to any individual to care for children, the department shall check the Child Abuse Central Index. The department shall not deny a license based upon a report from the Child Abuse Central Index unless child abuse or severe neglect is substantiated.
For any application received on or after January 1, 2008, if any prospective licensed or certified foster parent or any person age 18 or older residing in their household has lived in another State in the preceding 5 years, the licensing agency shall check that State’s child abuse and neglect registry.
If any person in the household is age 18 or older and has lived in another State in the preceding 5 years, the department shall check the other State’s child abuse and neglect registry to the extent required by Federal law prior to granting a license to, or otherwise approving, any foster family home.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Fingerprinting and a criminal records check of a prospective adoptive parent are required as part of the investigation for agency adoptions, independent adoptions, and intercountry adoptions.
The department or licensed adoption agency shall require each person filing an application for adoption to be fingerprinted and shall secure from an appropriate law enforcement agency any criminal record of that person to determine whether the person has ever been convicted of a crime other than a minor traffic violation. The department or licensed adoption agency also may secure the person’s full criminal record, if any.
The department or licensed adoption agency shall submit fingerprints and related information with any Federal level criminal offender record requests to the Department of Justice. The Department of Justice shall forward the request to the FBI to obtain information as to the existence of a record of an out-of-State or Federal conviction or arrest or Federal crimes or arrests for which the person is free on bail pending trial or appeal.
The criminal record, if any, shall be taken into consideration when evaluating the prospective adoptive parent, and an assessment of the effects of any criminal history on the ability of the adoptive parent to provide adequate and proper care and guidance to the child shall be included in the report to the court.
Under no circumstance shall an adoptive placement be approved when the prospective adoptive parent or any adult living in the home has either of the following:
Any felony conviction for child abuse or neglect; spousal abuse; crimes against a child, including child pornography; or for a crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including other physical assault and battery
A felony conviction that occurred within the last 5 years for physical assault, battery, or a drug- or alcohol-related offense

Colorado
Requirements for Foster Parents
For all family foster care or kinship care applicants, the county department or child-placing agency shall require each adult who is age 18 or older who resides in the home to obtain a fingerprint-based criminal history records check through the Colorado Bureau of Investigation and the FBI.
In addition, the department shall contact the appropriate entity in each State in which the applicant or any adult residing in the home has resided within the preceding 5 years to determine whether the adult has been found to be responsible in a confirmed report of child abuse or neglect.
An investigation shall be conducted for any new resident adult added to the foster care home. The department shall not issue a license or certificate to operate a foster care home if the applicant or a person who resides with the applicant has been convicted of:
Child abuse
A crime of violence
Any felony offenses involving unlawful sexual behavior
Any felony act of domestic violence
Any felony involving physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense within the preceding 5 years
A pattern of misdemeanor convictions within the preceding 10 years

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
In all petitions for adoption, a fingerprint-based criminal history records check is required for any prospective adoptive parent or any adult residing in the home.
The department or the child-placing agency, as may be appropriate, shall report to the court any case in which a fingerprint-based criminal history record check reveals that the prospective adoptive parent or any adult residing in the home was convicted at any time of a felony or misdemeanor in one of the following areas:
Child abuse or neglect
Spousal abuse
Any crime against a child, including, but not limited to, child pornography
Any crime of domestic violence
Violation of a protection order
Any crime involving violence, rape, sexual assault, or homicide
Any felony physical assault or battery conviction or felony drug-related conviction within the past 5 years
No person convicted of a felony offense specified above shall be allowed to adopt a child.
In addition to the fingerprint-based criminal history records check, the county department shall contact the State Department of Human Services and the appropriate entity in each State in which the prospective adoptive parent or any adult in the home has resided in the preceding 5 years to determine whether the prospective adoptive parent or any adult residing in the home has been found to be responsible in a confirmed report of child abuse or neglect.
In all stepparent, second parent, custodial, and kinship adoptions, the petition shall contain a statement informing the court of whether the prospective adoptive parent was convicted at any time by a court of competent jurisdiction of a felony or misdemeanor in one of the areas listed above. In addition, the petitioner shall submit a current criminal history records check paid for by the petitioner.

Connecticut
Requirements for Foster Parents
A State and national criminal history records check and a State child abuse registry check are required for a prospective foster parent and any household members age 16 or older.
When a criminal history records check is required, such check shall be requested from the State Police Bureau of Identification. The requesting party shall arrange for the fingerprinting of the individual or for conducting any other method of positive identification required by the State Police Bureau of Identification and, if a national criminal history records check is requested, by the FBI.
In regulation: The granting of a license or approval shall be denied if any member of the household of a foster family or prospective adoptive family:
Has been convicted of injury or risk of injury to a minor or other similar offenses against a minor
Has been convicted of impairing the morals of a minor or other similar offenses against a minor
Has been convicted of violent crime against a person or other similar offenses
Has been convicted of the possession, use, or sale of controlled substances within the past 5 years
Has been convicted of illegal use of a firearm or other similar offenses
Has ever had an allegation of child abuse or neglect substantiated
Has had a minor removed from his or her care because of child abuse or neglect

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A prospective adoptive parent, and any person age 16 or older living in the household, is required to undergo State and national criminal history records checks prior to placement of a child.
When a criminal history records check is required, such check shall be requested from the State Police Bureau of Identification. The requesting party shall arrange for the fingerprinting of the individual or for conducting any other method of positive identification required by the State Police Bureau of Identification and, if a national criminal history records check is requested, by the FBI.
The commissioner also shall check the State child abuse registry for the name of the applicant and for the name of any person age 16 or older living in the household of the applicant.
The granting of a license or approval shall be denied if the conditions listed above apply to any member of the prospective adoptive parent’s household.

Delaware
Requirements for Foster Parents
All prospective foster parents are required to submit fingerprints and other necessary information in order to obtain:
The person’s entire criminal history record from the Delaware State Police or a statement that the State Police Central Repository contains no information relating to that person
The person’s entire Federal criminal history record
A certification from the department as to whether the individual is named in the Central Register as the perpetrator of reported child abuse
Costs associated with obtaining the above information shall be borne by the State.
All information required above shall be forwarded to the Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families (DSCYF), which will assess the information and make a determination of suitability based upon the types of offenses, recency, record since the offenses, and responsibilities of the position that the individual is seeking to obtain. DSCYF must exercise case-by-case judgment on the results.
Persons convicted of a sexually related offense or other offenses against children shall be prohibited from foster care without consideration of other criteria. The prohibited offenses include:
Incest, unlawful sexual contact, or rape
Continuous sexual abuse, solicitation, or exploitation of a child
Abandonment of child
Unlawfully dealing in material depicting a child engaging in a prohibited sexual act
Murder of a child
Endangering the welfare of a child
The Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 prohibits individuals from becoming foster parents if they have the following felony convictions:
Child abuse or neglect; spousal abuse; crimes against children, including child pornography; and crimes involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, and homicide committed at any time
Physical assault, battery, and drug related offenses committed within the past 5 years

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
All prospective adoptive parents are required to submit fingerprints and other necessary information in order to obtain:
The person’s entire criminal history record from the Delaware State Police or a statement that the State Police Central Repository contains no information relating to that person
The person’s entire Federal criminal history record
A certification from the department as to whether the individual is named in the Central Register as the perpetrator of reported child abuse
Costs associated with obtaining the above information shall be borne by the State.
All information required above shall be forwarded to the DSCYF, which will assess the information and make a determination of suitability based upon the types of offenses, recency, record since the offenses, and responsibilities of the position that the individual is seeking to obtain. The DSCYF must exercise case-by-case judgment on the results.
Persons convicted of a sexually related offense or other offenses against children shall be prohibited from adopting without consideration of other criteria. The prohibited offenses include:
Incest, unlawful sexual contact, or rape
Continuous sexual abuse, solicitation, or exploitation of a child
Abandonment of child
Unlawfully dealing in material depicting a child engaging in a prohibited sexual act
Murder of a child
Endangering the welfare of a child
The Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 prohibits individuals from becoming adoptive parents if they have the following felony convictions:
Child abuse or neglect; spousal abuse; crimes against children, including child pornography; and crimes involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, and homicide committed at any time
Physical assault, battery, and drug-related offenses committed within the past 5 years

District of Columbia
Requirements for Foster Parents
A criminal records check is required for a person to be approved as a foster parent or kinship caregiver. A person will not be licensed as a foster parent if he or she or an adult residing in the foster parent’s home has a felony conviction for any of the following offenses or their equivalents:
Child abuse, child neglect, or an intrafamily offense
A crime against children, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, homicide, assault, or battery
Fraud, physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense, if committed within the last 5 years
In regulation: A criminal records check and a child protection registry check are required for a prospective foster parent.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A criminal records check is required for a prospective adoptive parent. A person will not be approved as an adoptive parent if he or she or an adult residing in the adoptive parent’s home has a felony conviction for any of the following offenses or their equivalents:
Child abuse, child neglect, or an intrafamily offense
A crime against children, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, homicide, assault, or battery
Fraud, physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense, if committed within the last 5 years
In regulation: A criminal background check and child abuse registry check are required for a prospective adoptive parent as part of the home study.

Florida
Requirements for Foster Parents
The department shall conduct a criminal history records check on all persons being considered by the department for placement of a child, including all nonrelative placements. All members of the household of the person being considered and frequent visitors to the household also must be checked
A criminal history records check may include, but is not limited to, submission of fingerprints to the Department of Law Enforcement for processing and forwarding to the FBI for State and national criminal history information, and local criminal records checks through local law enforcement agencies. A criminal history records check also must include a search of the department’s automated abuse information system.
The department may not place a child with a person other than a parent if the criminal history records check reveals that the person has been convicted of any felony that falls within any of the following categories:
Child abuse, abandonment, or neglect
Domestic violence
Child pornography or other felony in which a child was a victim of the offense
Homicide, sexual battery, or other felony involving violence, other than felony assault or felony battery when an adult was the victim
The department may not place a child with a person other than a parent if the criminal history records check reveals that the person, within the previous 5 years, has been convicted of a felony that falls within any of the following categories:
Assault
Battery
A drug-related offense

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The preliminary home study must include a records check of the central abuse registry and a criminal records check on the intended adoptive parents.
No minor may be placed in a home in which there resides any person determined by the court to be a sexual predator or to have been convicted of any of the following offenses:
Child abuse
First-degree or second-degree murder
Sexual battery that constitutes a capital, life, or first-degree felony
In regulation: Abuse hotline checks must be conducted on all adoptive applicants. For applicants who previously have been foster parents or have adopted in other States, abuse hotline checks must be completed in the previous State. Abuse hotline checks must be current within 30 days of placement of an adoptive child in the home. Abuse hotline checks also must be conducted on all other household members who are age 12 or older.
Criminal background checks through local, State, and Federal law enforcement agencies will be conducted on all persons age 12 or older residing in the prospective adoptive home. For applicants who have been foster parents or who have adopted in other States, local and State checks must be completed in the State of previous residence.
Juvenile delinquency checks must be conducted on all household members age 12 or older as a public record search. If this check reveals a juvenile justice record, this information must be addressed in the home study, and a determination must be made regarding possible impact on the adopted child.

Georgia
Requirements for Foster Parents
No licensed child welfare agency shall place a child in a foster care home unless the foster parent or parents and other adult persons that reside in the home or provide care to children placed in the home have received a satisfactory preliminary records check determination.
After obtaining the fingerprint records, the department shall notify in writing the agency or license applicant regarding whether the department’s determinations were satisfactory or unsatisfactory for each person for whom an application was received. If any such determinations were unsatisfactory, such homes shall not be used by the child welfare agency as foster care homes.
In addition to any other requirement established by law, the submission of fingerprints shall be a prerequisite to the issuance of a license or authorization for the operation of a foster home or to serve as foster parents as provided in this article. Such fingerprints shall be used for the purposes of fingerprint checks by the Georgia Crime Information Center and the FBI.
Evidence of a record of conviction of certain crimes shall result in an unsatisfactory determination. The crimes included are:
Battery, when the victim is a minor
Contributing to the delinquency of a minor
Sexual offenses
Criminal attempt of any of the crimes specified above
In regulation: A home study shall include the results of a criminal records check, as required by law, for each prospective foster parent and any adult residing in the home. When the individuals in the home have not resided in this State for the 5 years preceding their application to foster, the agency shall require additional documentation available through the State child welfare agency in which the applicant resided that the individuals are not listed on the child abuse and neglect registry.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The court shall require the petitioner submit to a criminal history records check. The petitioner shall submit his or her fingerprints to the Georgia Crime Information Center with the appropriate fee. The center shall promptly transmit the fingerprints to the FBI for a search of bureau records and shall obtain an appropriate report.
The Georgia Crime Information Center also shall promptly conduct a search of its records and any records to which it has access. The center shall notify the court in writing of the presence or absence of any derogatory finding, including, but not limited to, any conviction data regarding the fingerprint records check.
In regulation: The adoption home study shall include the results of a criminal records check, as required by law, for each prospective adoptive parent. When the individuals in the home have not resided in this State for the 5 years preceding their application to adopt, the agency shall require additional documentation available through the State child welfare agency in which the applicant resided that the individuals are not listed on the child abuse and neglect registry.

Guam
Requirements for Foster Parents
An investigation into whether the prospective foster parent was a defendant in any proceeding concerning allegedly neglected, abandoned, or delinquent children is required for licensure for foster care.
Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The investigation of the application for adoption shall include information on whether either parent has ever been a respondent in any proceeding concerning allegedly neglected, abandoned, or delinquent children.
In regulation: The adoption home study conducted by the department shall include a police clearance from the place of current or previous residence.

Hawaii
Requirements for Foster Parents
The department shall request:
A criminal history record check through the Hawaii criminal justice data center on all operators, employees, and new employees of child care institutions, child-placing organizations, and foster boarding homes, including all adults residing in the foster boarding homes, subject to licensure
A child abuse and neglect registry check on all operators, employees, and new employees of child care institutions, child-placing organizations, and adults residing in a foster boarding home subject to licensure
The department may deny a certificate of approval if an operator, employee, or new employee of a child care institution or child-placing organization’s facility, or any adult residing in a foster boarding home, was convicted of a crime other than a minor traffic violation involving a fine of $50 or less and if the department finds that the criminal history record or child abuse registry history of an operator, employee, new employee, or adult residing in a foster boarding home poses a risk to the health, safety, or well-being of the children in care.
The department shall make a name inquiry into the criminal history records for the first 2 years of certification of a foster boarding home and annually or biennially thereafter and into the child abuse and neglect registry in accordance with departmental procedures, depending on the certification status of the home.
Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Any person who seeks to become an adoptive parent, including all adults residing in the prospective adoptive home, shall be subject to criminal history record checks and child abuse and neglect registry checks.
The department may deny a person’s application to adopt a child if either of the prospective adoptive parents or any adult residing in the prospective adoptive home has been convicted of an offense for which incarceration is a sentencing option, and if the department finds by reason of the nature and circumstances of the crime that either of the prospective adoptive parents, or any adult residing in the prospective adoptive home, poses a risk to the health, safety, or well-being of the child.
The department may deny a person’s application to adopt a child if either of the prospective adoptive parents or any adult residing in the prospective adoptive home has a history of confirmed child abuse or neglect, or both, revealed by the child abuse and neglect registry check, and if the department finds by reason of the nature and circumstances of the abuse or neglect, or both, that either of the prospective adoptive parents or any adult residing in the prospective adoptive home poses a risk to the health, safety, or well-being of the child.

Idaho
Requirements for Foster Parents
The department shall obtain a criminal history check on the owners, operators, and employees of all children’s residential care facilities. The criminal history check shall include information from the following:
Statewide criminal identification bureau
FBI criminal history
National Crime Information Center
Statewide child abuse register
In regulation: All foster care applicants and other adult members of the household are required to complete a fingerprint-based criminal history and background check. An unconditional denial will be issued when the background reveals a conviction for a disqualifying crime:
Abuse, neglect, or exploitation of a vulnerable adult
Aggravated, first-degree, and second-degree arson
Crimes against nature
Forcible sexual penetration by use of a foreign object
Incest
Injury to a child
Kidnapping
Lewd conduct with a minor
Mayhem
Murder, voluntary manslaughter, assault, or battery with intent to commit a serious felony
Poisoning
Possession of sexually exploitative material
Rape
Robbery
Felony stalking
Sale or barter of a child
Sexual abuse or exploitation of a child
Video voyeurism
Enticing of children
Inducing individuals under age 18 into prostitution or patronizing a prostitute
Any felony punishable by death or life imprisonment
Attempt or conspiracy to commit any of the above
The department will issue an unconditional denial for conviction of the following crimes within the previous 5 years:
Aggravated assault
Aggravated battery
Arson in the third degree
Burglary
A felony involving a controlled substance
Felony or grand theft
Forgery, counterfeiting, or fraudulent use of a financial transaction card
Insurance or public assistance fraud
Attempt, conspiracy, or aiding and abetting to commit any of the above

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A social investigation is required for the prospective adoptive family and all of its members.
In regulation: All persons applying to the department or petitioning the court to be an adoptive parent and all adults in the home, except stepparents applying for adoption of a stepchild, are required to complete a fingerprint-based criminal history and background check. An unconditional denial shall be issued for any of the crimes listed above.

Illinois
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based FBI and State criminal background check is required for foster care licensure. A check of the Central Register is required to ascertain if the applicant has been determined to be a perpetrator in an indicated report of child abuse or neglect.
In regulation: A background check includes a check of the Illinois Sex Offender Registry and the National Sex Offenders Registry, as appropriate. Persons who have a conviction shall not be automatically rejected as foster parents unless the offense is one listed below.
If the applicant or any adult member of the household has been declared a sexually dangerous person or convicted of committing or attempting to commit one or more serious criminal offenses, this will serve as a bar to receiving a foster home license. The offenses may include:
Murder or voluntary manslaughter
Kidnapping
Sex offenses, including sexual exploitation of a child, child pornography, or prostitution
Offenses resulting in bodily harm
If the applicant or any adult member of the household has been convicted of a serious criminal offense, he or she will be barred from receiving a foster home license unless all of the following requirements are met:
The relevant criminal offense occurred more than 10 years ago.
The applicant had previously disclosed the conviction to the department.
After the disclosure, the department either placed a child in the home or the foster family home license was issued.
During the background check, the department had assessed and waived the conviction in compliance with the existing statutes and rules in effect at the time.
The applicant meets all other requirements and qualifications to be licensed as a foster family home.
The applicant has a history of providing a safe, stable, home environment and appears able to continue to do so.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A fingerprint-based FBI and State criminal background check is required for a prospective adoptive parent as part of the adoption investigation.
The results of the criminal background check shall be provided to the court for its review. The court may, in its discretion, weigh the significance of the results of the criminal background check against the entirety of the background of the petitioners.
In regulation: An adoptive home shall be licensed as a foster family home before placement of an unrelated child for adoption.

Indiana
Requirements for Foster Parents
The department or, at the discretion of the department, an applicant, shall conduct a criminal history check of:
The applicant’s employees and volunteers who have or will have direct contact, on a regular and continuing basis, with children who are or will be under the direct supervision of the applicant
All household members who are at least age 14
The department shall make a determination whether the subject of a national fingerprint-based criminal history check has a record of a conviction for a felony or a misdemeanor relating to the health and safety of a child. A criminal history check is required only at the time an application for a new license or the renewal of an existing license is submitted.
A fingerprint-based criminal history background check for an employee or volunteer must be completed no later than the first 90 days of employment or assignment of a volunteer.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A child may not be placed in a proposed adoptive home without the prior written approval of a licensed child-placing agency or the Department of Child Services. Before giving approval for placement of a child in a proposed adoptive home, a licensed child-placing agency or the department shall conduct a criminal history check (as defined below) concerning the proposed adoptive parent and any other person who is currently residing in the proposed adoptive home.
The term ‘’conduct a criminal history check’’ means to:
Request the State police department to:
Release a limited criminal history and juvenile history data concerning a person who is at least age 14 and who » »is a resident of the applicant’s household
Conduct a fingerprint-based criminal history background check of both national and State records databases » »concerning a person who is at least age 18
Conduct a national name-based criminal history record check of a person who is at least age 18» »
Collect each substantiated report of child abuse or neglect reported in a jurisdiction where a probation officer, a caseworker, or the Department of Child Services has reason to believe that a person for whom a criminal history background check is required has resided within the previous 5 years
Request information concerning any substantiated report of child abuse and neglect relating to a person described above that is contained in a national registry of substantiated cases that is maintained by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Iowa
Requirements for Foster Parents
A records check for whether a prospective foster parent and foster care personnel were convicted of any crimes or child abuse is required as a part of the foster care licensure. In addition to the record checks, the individual’s fingerprints shall be provided to the Department of Public Safety for submission to the FBI for a national criminal history check.
A prospective foster parent will not be licensed if he or she was convicted of any of the following felony offenses:
A drug-related offense, if committed within the 5-year period preceding the application date
Child endangerment or neglect or abandonment of a dependent person
Domestic abuse
A crime against a child, including but not limited to, sexual exploitation of a minor
A forcible felony
In regulation: Each foster parent applicant and anyone who is age 14 or older living in the home of the applicant shall be checked for records with:
The Iowa Central Abuse Registry
The Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation
The Iowa Sex Offender Registry
Other records
Each foster parent applicant and any other adult living in the household also shall be checked for records on the child abuse registry of any State where the person has lived during the past 5 years. Each foster parent applicant also shall be fingerprinted for a national criminal history check. Other adults living in the home may be fingerprinted if the department determines that a national criminal history check is warranted.
If the applicant or anyone living in the home has a record of founded child abuse, a criminal conviction, or placement on the sex offender registry, the department shall not license the applicant as a foster family unless an evaluation determines that the abuse or criminal conviction does not warrant prohibition of license.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A records check for whether a prospective adoptive parent was convicted of any crimes or child abuse is required as a part of the preadoptive investigation.
A prospective adoptive parent will not be approved if he or she was convicted of any of the following felony offenses:
A drug-related offense, if committed within the 5-year period preceding the petition date
Child endangerment or neglect or abandonment of a dependent person
Domestic abuse
A crime against a child, including, but not limited to, sexual exploitation of a minor
A forcible felony
In regulation: The certified adoption investigator shall submit record checks for each applicant and for any other adults living in the home of the applicant to determine whether they have founded child abuse reports or criminal convictions.
If there is a record of founded child abuse or a criminal conviction for the applicant or any other adults living in the home of the applicant, the applicant shall not be approved as an adoptive family, unless an evaluation determines that the abuse or criminal conviction does not warrant prohibition of approval.

Kansas
Requirements for Foster Parents
No licensed child care facility, including a foster home, may have on the premises a person who has:
A felony conviction for a crime against persons, including murder, manslaughter, assault, battery, or kidnapping
A felony conviction under sections 1 through 17 of 2009 Kans. HB 2236, relating to controlled substances
A conviction of any act described in chapter 21, article 35 [sex offenses, including rape, sexual battery, or sexual exploitation of a child]
A conviction of any act described in chapter 21, article 36 [crimes affecting family relationships and children, including incest, or abuse, abandonment, or endangerment of a child]
A conviction of an attempt to commit any such act
A conviction for promoting obscenity or promoting obscenity to minors
Been adjudicated a juvenile offender for any of the above acts
Committed an act of physical, mental or emotional abuse, neglect, or sexual abuse and who is listed in the child abuse and neglect registry maintained by the department
Had a child removed from home in this or any other State based on a finding of abuse or neglect or sexual abuse, and the child has not been returned home
Had parental rights terminated
The secretary is authorized to conduct fingerprint-based national criminal history record checks to determine criminal history on persons residing, working, or regularly volunteering in a foster care home. The secretary shall submit the fingerprints to the Kansas Bureau of Investigation and the FBI.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
An adoption investigation report must include the results of a child abuse registry check and a criminal registry check that determines whether the prospective adoptive parent has any prior felony convictions.
In making the assessment, the social worker, child-placing agency, or the Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services shall determine whether the petitioner has been convicted of a felony for any act described in chapter 21, articles 34 [crimes against persons, such as murder, manslaughter, assault, battery, or kidnapping], 35 [sex offenses, such as rape, sexual battery, or sexual exploitation of a child], or 36 [crimes affecting family relationships or children, such as incest, or abuse, abandonment, or endangerment of a child] or, within the last 5 years has been convicted of a felony violation of sections 1 through 17 of 2009 Kans. HB 2236, relating to controlled substances, and, when appropriate, any similar conviction in another jurisdiction.
The costs of making the assessment and report may be assessed as court costs.

Kentucky
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based State and FBI criminal background investigation is required for a prospective foster parent and any adult household members.
In regulation: An applicant and each adult member of the household shall submit to:
An in-State criminal records check
A child abuse or neglect check for each State of residence during the past 5 years
A criminal records check conducted by means of a fingerprint check of the National Crime Information Database
Prior to approval of an applicant, each adolescent member of the household shall submit to a child abuse or neglect check. A child abuse or neglect check shall identify the name of each applicant, adolescent member of the household, or adult member of the household who has been found to have:
Committed sexual abuse or sexual exploitation of a child
Been responsible for a child fatality related to abuse or neglect
Abused or neglected a child within 7 years immediately prior to the application
Had parental rights terminated
An applicant shall not be approved if a criminal records check reveals that the applicant or adult member of the household has a:
Felony conviction involving a spouse, a child, sexual violence, or death; or physical abuse, battery, or drug or alcohol offense within 5 years prior to application
Criminal conviction relating to child abuse or neglect
Civil judicial determination related to child abuse or neglect
An application will be denied if a child abuse or neglect check reveals that the applicant, adolescent member of the household, or adult member of the household has been found to have:
Committed sexual abuse or sexual exploitation of a child
Been responsible for a child fatality related to abuse or neglect
Had parental rights terminated involuntarily

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A fingerprint-based State and FBI criminal background investigation is required for a prospective foster parent and any adult household members.
In regulation: An applicant and each adult member of the household shall submit to:
An in-State criminal records check
A child abuse or neglect check for each State of residence during the past 5 years
A criminal records check conducted by means of a fingerprint check of the National Crime Information Database
Prior to approval of an applicant, each adolescent member of the household shall submit to a child abuse or neglect check. A child abuse or neglect check shall identify the name of each applicant, adolescent member of the household, or adult member of the household who has been found to have:
Committed sexual abuse or sexual exploitation of a child
Been responsible for a child fatality related to abuse or neglect
Abused or neglected a child within 7 years immediately prior to the application
Had parental rights terminated

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
An applicant shall not be approved if a criminal records check reveals that the applicant or adult member of the household has a:
Felony conviction involving a spouse, a child, sexual violence, or death; or physical abuse, battery, a drug or alcohol offense within 5 years prior to application
Criminal conviction relating to child abuse or neglect
Civil judicial determination related to child abuse or neglect
An application will be denied if a child abuse or neglect check reveals that the applicant, adolescent member of the household, or adult member of the household has been found to have:
Committed sexual abuse or sexual exploitation of a child
Been responsible for a child fatality related to abuse or neglect
Had parental rights terminated involuntarily

Louisiana
Requirements for Foster Parents
A Federal and State criminal records check is required for prospective foster parents, kinship foster parents, and any adult household members as a part of the investigation for licensing foster parents.
The Department of Social Services, Office of Community Services, shall investigate the background of each person who applies to be a foster parent. The investigation shall include, but shall not be limited to, a determination of whether the applicant or any adult member of the applicant’s household has been charged with a crime and, if so, the disposition of those charges.
The office shall require each applicant and adult family member to provide fingerprints and such authorization as is necessary to conduct State and national criminal history record checks and to obtain any other information required to complete the investigation.
No child shall be newly placed in a foster home for temporary care, except for emergency placement, until it is determined that no adult living in such home has been convicted of or pled nolo contendere to a crime listed in Rev. Stat. § 15:587.1(C). The crimes listed include:
Murder and manslaughter
Rape and sexual battery
Kidnapping
Incest
Criminal neglect of family
Criminal abandonment
Child pornography and molestation
Cruelty to juveniles
Sale of minor children
Manufacture and distribution of controlled dangerous drugs

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The State police and the Louisiana Bureau of Criminal Identification and Information shall conduct a records check for all Federal and State arrests and convictions in this and any other States in which either of the prospective adoptive parents has been domiciled. Each prospective adoptive parent shall submit a set of fingerprints to the State police.
The department shall conduct a records check for validated complaints of child abuse or neglect in this or any other State in which either of the prospective adoptive parents has been domiciled since becoming an adult, involving either prospective adoptive parent.
The investigation shall include, but shall not be limited to, a determination of whether the applicant or any adult member of the applicant’s household has been charged with a crime and, if so, the disposition of those charges.
The office shall require each applicant and adult family member to provide fingerprints and such authorization as is necessary to conduct State and national criminal history record checks and to obtain any other information required to complete the investigation.
No child shall be newly placed for adoption until it is determined that no adult living in such home has been convicted of or pled nolo contendere to a crime listed in the section above.

Maine
Requirements for Foster Parents
This issue is not addressed in statute. The following information is from the Code of Maine Rules.
At the time of initial application, the applicant shall undergo fingerprinting in order to allow the department to submit required fingerprint-based checks of national crime information databases.
At the time of initial or renewal application, the applicant shall submit releases signed by each adult member of the household and, at the discretion of the department, releases signed by any person who frequents the home who may have unsupervised access to the foster children. The releases will permit the department to request criminal history records from the Departments of Public Safety, State Police, Bureau of Identification, or other law enforcement agencies from any past or present residence, including out-of-State law enforcement agencies.
The department shall not grant a license to a person convicted of a felony involving:
Child abuse or neglect
Spousal abuse
A crime against a child, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide
The department shall not grant a license to a person convicted within the last 5 years of a felony involving:
Physical assault or battery
A drug-related offense
An application may be denied if the applicant has an open child protective services case or a closed substantiated and/or indicated child protective services case. An open child protective services case includes a pending disposition of an open report, a case open for assessment, or a case open for services.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The court shall request a background check for each prospective adoptive parent who is not the biological parent of the child. The background check must include a screening for child abuse cases in the records of the department and criminal history record information obtained from the Maine Criminal Justice Information System and the FBI.
Each prospective parent who is not the biological parent of the child shall submit to having fingerprints taken. The State Police, upon receipt of the fingerprint card, may charge the court for the expenses incurred in processing State and national criminal history record checks.
State and Federal criminal history record information may be used by the department for the purpose of screening prospective adoptive parents in determining whether the adoption is in the best interests of the child.
There is a rebuttable presumption that the petitioner would create a situation of jeopardy for the child if the adoption were granted, and the adoption is not in the best interest of the child if the court finds that the petitioner:
Has been convicted of a child-related sexual offense listed in Title 19-A, § 1653(6-A)(A), in which the victim was a minor at the time of the offense, and the petitioner was at least 5 years older than the minor except that, if the offense was gross sexual assault under Title 17-A, §253(1), and the minor victim submitted as a result of compulsion; the presumption applies regardless of the ages of the petitioner and the minor victim at the time of the offense
Has been adjudicated in an action under Title 22, chapter 1071 of sexually abusing a person who was a minor at the time of the abuse

Maryland
Requirements for Foster Parents
A criminal history records check shall be obtained by a foster care home applicant. As part of the application for a criminal history records check, the applicant shall submit a complete set of legible fingerprints.
In regulation: The foster parent home study must include:
A review of local department records to determine whether a member of the family has an indicated finding of abuse or neglect
A review of the results of the State and Federal criminal background checks
As part of the certification process, the agency shall review charges, investigations, convictions, or findings related to a crime of any household member of the foster parent to determine:
The possible effect on the applicant’s ability to execute the responsibilities of a foster parent
The applicant’s ability to provide quality service to children in foster care
Foster parent certification may be denied if the applicant:
Refuses to consent to the child protective services clearance and the criminal background check
Has an indicated child abuse finding
Has a felony conviction for child abuse or neglect, spousal abuse, a crime against children, rape, sexual assault, or homicide
In the 5 years before the date of application for foster parent certification, has a felony conviction for physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense
Refuses to consent to the Motor Vehicle Administration clearance

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A criminal history records check shall be obtained on:
A person who is seeking to adopt a child through a child-placing agency
An adult relative with whom a child is placed by the local department
Any adult residing in the home where a child may be placed
As part of the application for a criminal history records check, the applicant shall submit a complete set of legible fingerprints.
In regulation: Before an adoptive home may be approved, an applicant and all household members age 18 or older shall apply for a criminal background investigation. After the home is approved, if other individuals who are age 18 or older come to live with the family, they shall apply for a criminal background investigation within 30 days of moving into the household.
The department may not approve or continue to approve as an adoptive home any home in which an adult in the household has been convicted of:
A crime that the local department feels raises serious concern for a child’s safety
Any crime enumerated in 42 U.S.C. 671(a)(20)
Before an adoptive home may be approved, an applicant and all household members age 18 or older shall consent to a child protective services clearance to determine if there is a prior indicated or unsubstantiated finding of abuse or neglect for any family or household member.
The department may not approve or continue to approve as an adoptive home any home in which an individual:
Refuses to consent to the child protective services clearance
Has an indicated child abuse or neglect finding

Massachusetts
Requirements for Foster Parents
No child shall be placed in a foster home before the approval of the home by the department. This approval shall include criminal record information checks on all persons age 18 or older residing at the home. If the result of any of these checks shows that any occupant of the home has a criminal record involving violence, abuse, or exploitation against any person, which bears adversely upon the person’s ability to assume and carry out the responsibilities of a foster parent or poses a serious threat of harm to a child, the home shall not be approved by the department.
In regulation: Whenever an individual contacts the department for the purpose of applying to be a foster parent, the department shall conduct a criminal offender record investigation as part of the initial screening process on the individual(s) applying and household members age 14 and older.
A candidate for foster parent certification shall be ineligible if he or she has been convicted of or has any pending charges involving crimes listed in 110 CMR 18.16: Table A. Crimes on this list include, but are not limited to:
Assault and battery with a dangerous weapon of a victim over age 60
Assault and battery of a child or a retarded person
Armed assault with intent to murder or rob
Armed robbery or carjacking
Assault with intent to murder, maim, or rape
Distribution of a controlled substance to a minor
Sexual exploitation of a child
Incest
Indecent assault and battery of a child
Inducing a minor to prostitution
Kidnapping
Negligent manslaughter of a minor
Murder or manslaughter
Perjury
Aggravated or statutory rape
Trafficking in cocaine, heroin, or marijuana
Unnatural acts with a child under age 16
Conspiracy to commit any of the above offenses
Accessory before any crime in this category
Attempts to commit any crime in this category

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A review of any misdemeanor offense discovered through a criminal offender record information search is required for a prospective adoptive parent.
In regulation: Whenever an individual contacts the department for the purpose of applying to be a preadoptive parent, the department shall conduct a criminal offender record investigation as part of the initial screening process on the individual(s) applying and household members age 14 and older.
A candidate for preadoptive parent certification shall be ineligible if he or she has been convicted of or has any pending charges involving crimes listed in 110 CMR 18.16: Table A. Crimes on this list include, but are not limited to:
Assault and battery with a dangerous weapon of a victim over age 60
Assault and battery of a child or a retarded person
Armed assault with intent to murder or rob
Armed robbery or carjacking
Assault with intent to murder, maim, or rape
Murder or manslaughter
Distribution of a controlled substance to a minor
Sexual exploitation of a child
Incest
Indecent assault and battery of a child
Inducing a minor to prostitution
Kidnapping
Negligent manslaughter of a minor
Perjury
Aggravated or statutory rape
Trafficking in cocaine, heroin, or marijuana
Unnatural acts with a child under age 16
Conspiracy to commit any of the above offenses
Accessory before any crime in this category
Attempts to commit any crime in this category

Michigan
Requirements for Foster Parents
When a person applies for a certificate to operate a family foster home, the department shall request the State police to conduct a criminal history check and a national criminal records check through the FBI on the person. The applicant shall be required to submit his or her fingerprints for the investigation.
A person to whom a license has been issued shall report to the department within 3 business days after he or she, or an employee or other person over age 18 residing in the home, has been arraigned for one or more of the following crimes:
Any felony
Criminal sexual conduct in the fourth degree
Child abuse in the third or fourth degree
A misdemeanor involving cruelty, torture, or indecent exposure involving a child
Misdemeanor distribution of a controlled substance
A violation of the Michigan penal code, sections 750.115 [breaking and entering], 750.141a [allowing a child to consume alcohol], 750.145a [child solicitation], 750.335a [indecent exposure], 750.81 [assault and battery], 750.81a [domestic violence, and 750.145d [Internet crimes against children]
Selling or furnishing alcohol to a minor (436.1701)
In regulation: An agency shall have a written assessment of all criminal convictions of prospective staff before hiring or assigning a person to a position covered by these rules. The assessment shall take into account the nature of the convictions, when the convictions occurred, and evidence of rehabilitation.
An agency shall, upon receipt of an application, initiate a records check of each applicant and each adult member of the household. The check shall include previous licenses, criminal convictions, and substantiated child abuse and neglect records.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
An individual seeking to adopt must have a preplacement assessment prepared by a child-placing agency. The assessment shall indicate:
Whether the individual has ever been the respondent in a domestic violence proceeding or a proceeding concerning a child who was allegedly abused, dependent, deprived, neglected, abandoned, or delinquent, and the outcome of the proceeding
Whether the individual has ever been convicted of a crime
The individual seeking a preplacement assessment shall provide a document from the Michigan State Police and the FBI describing all of the individual’s criminal convictions as shown by that agency’s records or stating that the agency’s records indicate that the individual has not been convicted of a crime.
Upon request of the individual and receipt of a signed authorization, the child-placing agency shall obtain the criminal record from the law enforcement agency on the individual’s behalf.

Minnesota
Requirements for Foster Parents
A background study shall review:
Records of substantiated perpetrators of maltreatment of vulnerable adults
Records relating to the maltreatment of minors in licensed programs
Information from juvenile courts, the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, and the National Crime Information Center
A background study for a child foster care application for licensure also shall review:
The child abuse and neglect registry for any State in which the individual has resided during the past 5 years
Information from national crime information databases for any individual age 18 or older
Applicants can be permanently disqualified if they have been convicted of murder, manslaughter, spousal abuse, child abuse or neglect, aggravated robbery, kidnapping, prostitution, criminal sexual conduct, arson, drive-by shooting, harassment, or stalking.
An individual is disqualified if less than 15 years has passed since the termination of his or her parental rights.

Applicants are disqualified if:
Less than 15 years have passed since they have committed a felony-level offense of wrongfully obtaining assistance, false representation, Federal food stamp program fraud, criminal vehicular homicide and injury, assault, criminal abuse or financial exploitation of a vulnerable adult, use of drugs to injure or facilitate crime, robbery, repeat offenses of criminal sexual conduct in the fifth degree, medical assistance fraud, theft, identity theft, insurance or financial fraud, check forgery, weapons charges, indecent exposure, or a conviction involving alcohol or drug use.
Less than 10 years have passed since they committed a gross misdemeanor-level offense of any of the offenses listed above.
Less than 7 years have passed since they committed a misdemeanor-level violation of any of the offenses listed above.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
An adoption background study shall include:
A check of the child abuse and neglect registry for any State in which the individual has resided for the past 5 years
Information from national crime information databases for any person age 18 or older
Each prospective adoptive parent must provide all addresses at which he or she and anyone in the household over age 13 has resided in the previous 5 years and disclose any names used previously.
The agency shall immediately initiate a background study on each person over age 13 living in the home. A home study used to consider placement of any child on whose behalf title IV-E adoption assistance payments are to be made must not be approved if a background study reveals a felony conviction at any time for:
Child abuse or neglect
Spousal abuse
A crime against children, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including other physical assault or battery
A home study must not be approved if a background study reveals a felony conviction within the past 5 years for:
Physical assault or battery
A drug-related offense

Mississippi
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based FBI and State criminal background check and child abuse registry check are required for providers of foster care. A prospective foster parent will be denied licensure if he or she has a criminal history of conviction or pending indictment of a crime, whether a misdemeanor or a felony, that bears upon his or her fitness to have responsibility for the safety and well-being of children.
All fees incurred in compliance with this section shall be borne by the individual or entity to which this law applies. The Department of Human Services shall have the authority to set fees, to exclude a particular crime or crimes or a substantiated finding of child abuse and/or neglect as disqualifying individuals or entities from providing foster care or residential child care, and adopt such other rules and regulations as may be required to carry out the provisions of this section.
In regulation: Law enforcement and child abuse central registry clearances shall be obtained for all adult household members, age 18 and older. The applicant, foster parent, and adult household members shall be free of conviction or indictment for, or involvement in the criminal offenses included, but not limited to, those listed above.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Effective July 1, 2009: For adoptions, other than those in which the petitioner is a relative or stepparent of the child, the court shall require that a home study be performed by a licensed adoption agency or the Department of Human Services. The home study shall be considered by the court in determining whether the petitioner is a suitable parent for the child.
In regulation: A central child abuse registry check is required for a prospective adoptive parent.
Each prospective adoptive parent must disclose any criminal record or alleged criminal activity by signing a disclosure form. A routine check with the local law enforcement agencies (both city and county) in the current as well as the last place of residence will be a part of the adoption study.

Missouri
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based FBI and State criminal records check is required for any person over age 17 in the prospective foster parent’s household and for any child younger than age 17 residing in the prospective foster parent’s household who the Family Support Division has determined has been certified as an adult for the commission of a crime.
The investigation also shall determine whether any person over age 17 residing in the home is listed on the child abuse and neglect registry.
The total cost of fingerprinting required by this section may be paid by the State, including reimbursement of persons incurring fingerprinting costs under this section.
In regulation: All foster and relative care providers, prior to being granted licensure, approval, or certification status, shall submit to the division an application for background screening and investigation.
The division shall conduct the background screening and investigation. Information obtained regarding harmful acts to a child is provided to local division staff who are responsible for completing the home study. Findings of harmful acts do not automatically preclude approval. The relevance of the findings to child-caring responsibilities will be determined by division staff.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A criminal background check is required for a prospective adoptive parent.
In regulation: All adoptive parents, prior to being granted approval status, shall submit to the division an application for background screening and investigation.
The division shall conduct the background screening and investigation. Information obtained regarding harmful acts to a child is provided to local division staff who are responsible for completing the home study. Findings of harmful acts do not automatically preclude approval. The relevance of the findings to child-caring responsibilities will be determined by division staff.

Montana
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based FBI and State criminal and child protection background check, which must include information pertaining to criminal convictions, reports of domestic violence, and substantiated child abuse or neglect of children, is required for a prospective foster, kinship, or extended care provider.
In regulation: For licensure as a youth foster home, a satisfactory criminal background, motor vehicle, and child and adult protective services check is required for each person living in the household.
A new applicant must submit a completed fingerprint card so that a fingerprint-based criminal records check can be requested. If a new applicant who has lived only in Montana cannot be successfully fingerprinted, a name-based criminal records check will be used. If an applicant who has lived in States other than Montana cannot be successfully fingerprinted:
A criminal history check will be requested from every State in which an applicant has lived in the past 15 years.
A check will be made of the violent offender and criminal history registries if this information is available for States in which the applicant has lived.
If, after 45 days, the department has been unable to obtain results of a criminal records check for an applicant who has lived in Montana for at least 5 years, he or she must sign an affidavit attesting to his or her lack of criminal history. The affidavit will be accepted in lieu of a criminal history check.
An annual name-based criminal records check and a motor vehicle check for licensed foster parents are required for relicensure. If an applicant has children, a child protective services check will be requested from all States in which he or she has lived since the birth date of his or her oldest child. If an applicant does not have children, a child protective services check will be requested from all States in which he or she has lived in the previous 15 years.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A check of criminal conviction data, data on substantiated abuse or neglect of a child, and data pertaining to any involvement in incidents of domestic violence is required for a prospective adoptive parent as part of the preplacement evaluation. The adoption study also may include a check of the youth court records of any person living in the prospective home.
If applicable, the study must include an evaluation of the effect of a conviction, adjudication, or finding of substantiated abuse or neglect on the ability to care for a child.

Nebraska
Requirements for Foster Parents
Before the foster care placement of any child in Nebraska by the department, the department shall require a national fingerprint-based criminal history record check of the prospective foster parent and each member of the prospective foster parent’s household who is age 18 or older.
In regulation: Each household member, as appropriate, must be checked with the State central register of child protection cases, the Adult Protective Services central registry, the Sex Offenders Registry, and the FBI.
The department shall deny licensure to any applicant currently charged, indicted, or convicted for any of the following crimes:
Aggravated or armed robbery
Arson
Assault
Child abandonment, abuse, neglect, or molestation
Commercial sexual exploitation of a minor
Criminal nonsupport
Domestic violence
Exploitation of a minor involving drug offenses
Felony controlled substances offenses
Felony violation of custody
Incest
Kidnapping
Murder
Robbery
Sexual abuse of a minor
Sexual assault
Sexual exploitation of a minor, including child pornography
Voluntary manslaughter
The department shall deny licensure to any applicant convicted in the last 5 years of any of the following crimes:
Burglary
Driving under the influence
Misdemeanor controlled substances offenses
Misdemeanor contributing to the delinquency of a child
Each household member age 13 or older must be cleared against the central register. The department shall deny licensure if any household member is identified as a perpetrator on the central register.
Each household member age 18 or older must be cleared against the Adult Protective Services central registry. The department shall deny licensure if any household member is identified as a perpetrator on the Adult Protective Services central registry.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
An adoptive home study shall not be required when the petitioner is a stepparent of the adopted person unless required by the court, except that for petitions filed on or after January 1, 1994, the judge shall order the petitioner to request the Nebraska State Patrol to file a national criminal history record information check and to request the department to conduct a check of the central register for any history of the petitioner of behavior that may endanger the health or morals of a child. An adoption decree shall not be issued until such records are on file with the court. The petitioner shall pay the cost of the national criminal history record information check and the check of the central register.
Any adoptive home study required by this section shall be conducted by the department or a licensed child-placing agency at the expense of the petitioner or petitioners unless such expenses are waived by the department or licensed child-placing agency. The department or licensed agency shall determine the fee or rate for the adoptive home study.
The preplacement or postplacement adoptive home study shall be performed as prescribed in the rules and regulations of the department and shall include, at a minimum, an examination into the facts relating to the petitioner or petitioners as may be relevant to the propriety of such adoption. Such rules and regulations shall require an adoptive home study to include a national criminal history record information check and a check of the central register for any history of the petitioner or petitioners of behavior injurious to or that may endanger the health or morals of a child.

Nevada
Requirements for Foster Parents
Each applicant for a foster care license, prospective employee of that applicant, or resident of a foster home who is age 18 or older must submit to the licensing authority a complete set of fingerprints and written permission authorizing the licensing authority to:
Forward the fingerprints to the Central Repository for Nevada Records of Criminal History for submission to the FBI for its report
Conduct a child abuse and neglect screening
For each applicant, the licensing authority shall conduct a child abuse and neglect screening of the person in every State in which the person has resided during the immediately preceding 5 years.
In regulation: Any applicant who has been investigated by an agency that provides child welfare services and regarding whom a finding of substantiated abuse or neglect of a child has been made by that agency, or whose own children have been in foster care or otherwise placed outside of the home for the purpose of adoption or foster care, must be denied a license to operate a foster home. A license will be denied if the applicant:
Has been convicted of a crime involving harm to a child
Has charges pending against him or her for a crime involving harm to a child
Has been arrested and is awaiting final disposition of the charges pending against him or her for a crime involving harm to a child
Has a felony conviction, charges pending for a felony conviction, or has been arrested and is awaiting final disposition of the charges pending for a felony conviction for:
Child abuse or neglect
Spousal abuse
Any crime against children, including child pornography
Any crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including any other physical » »assault or battery
Physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense, if the offense was committed within the last 5 years

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Fingerprint-based FBI and State criminal history records checks are required for prospective adoptive parents as part of the adoption investigation.
In regulation: The agency shall evaluate applicants to determine their suitability for becoming adoptive parents. Such an evaluation must include:
A review of any reports and investigations made regarding the abuse or neglect of a child by the applicant or any member of the applicant’s household who is age 18 or older
A review of any information concerning the applicant and any member of the applicant’s household who is age 18 or older maintained by local agencies of law enforcement
A review of any records of criminal history regarding the applicant and any member of the applicant’s household who is age 18 or older
An application to adopt must be denied if, based upon a substantiated investigation, the applicant or a member of the applicant’s household who is age 18 or older:
Has been convicted of or has charges pending for a crime involving harm to a child
Has been arrested and is awaiting final disposition of the charges pending for a crime involving harm to a child
Has felony charges pending or has been arrested and is awaiting final disposition of possible or pending charges involving:
Child abuse or neglect» »
Spousal abuse» »
Any crime against children, including child pornography» »
Any crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including other physical » »assault or battery
Physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense, if the offense was committed within the last 5 years» »

New Hampshire
Requirements for Foster Parents
For an initial application for a foster family home license, the department shall conduct a background check of the prospective foster parents and all household members age 17 or older. The background check shall consist of a fingerprint-based criminal record check of national crime information databases for the prospective foster parents and a central registry check for the prospective foster parents and all household members age 17 or older.
The central registry check shall include a check of the department’s central registry of founded reports of child abuse and neglect and a check of the child abuse and neglect registries in any other State in which the prospective foster parents or other adult living in the home has resided in the preceding 5 years.
In regulation: The department may deny an application for or revoke a foster family care license if the applicants are the subject of a founded report of child abuse or neglect in New Hampshire or any other State.
The department shall deny an application for a foster family care license if the applicant:
Has been convicted of a felony for child abuse or neglect, spousal abuse, any crime against children, child pornography, rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including other physical assault or battery
Has been convicted of a felony for physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense within the past 5 years
Has been convicted of a violent or sexually related crime against a child or of a crime that shows the person might be reasonably expected to pose a threat to a child, such as a violent crime or a sexually related crime against an adult
Has a motor vehicle record or is the subject of a report from another source that, following assessment, shows that the applicant might reasonably be expected to pose a threat of harm to a child

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A background check is required for all private adoptions. The background check shall include both a criminal records check conducted by the New Hampshire State police and a search of the abuse and neglect registry maintained by the department. If the petitioner has lived in another State, the court also may request a search of that State’s abuse and neglect registry.
The court shall require a background check in all adoption proceedings initiated by the department or by another child-placing agency. The background check shall consist of a fingerprint-based criminal record check of national crime information databases for all prospective adoptive parents and a central registry check for all prospective adoptive parents and any other adult living in the home.
The central registry check shall include a check of the central registry of founded reports of child abuse and neglect and a check of the child abuse and neglect registries in any other State in which the prospective adoptive parent or other adult living in the home has resided in the preceding 5 years.
In regulation: The minimum requirements for acceptance of the adoptive parent applicants shall include:
The adoptive parent applicant shall not have been convicted of child abuse or neglect or any other serious crime that would affect the ability to care for children.
The adoptive parent applicants and all household members shall be screened by the department for any founded reports of child abuse or neglect.
If a founded report is on file for any member of the adoptive parent applicant’s household, staff from the Division of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF) in cooperation with staff from the child-placing agency shall conduct a complete review of the circumstances surrounding the report.
After review, if DCYF determines that the household member poses no further threat to any child, the child- placing agency shall proceed with the application process.

New Jersey
Requirements for Foster Parents
As a condition of securing and maintaining a license, the foster care applicant shall ensure that a fingerprint-based State and Federal criminal history background check, current within 1 year, and a child abuse record check are completed for each applicant and each household member at least age 18.
A person shall be disqualified from being a foster parent if that person or any adult residing in that person’s household ever committed a crime that resulted in a conviction for:
A crime against a child, including endangering the welfare of a child, child pornography, child abuse, neglect, or abandonment
Murder or manslaughter
Aggravated assault in the second or third degree
Stalking
Kidnapping, criminal restraint, false imprisonment, interference with custody, criminal coercion, or enticing a child into a motor vehicle, structure, or isolated area
Sexual assault, criminal sexual contact, or lewdness
Robbery in the first degree
Burglary in the second degree
Domestic violence
Endangering the welfare of an incompetent person or an elderly or disabled person
Terrorist threats
Arson
A person shall be disqualified from being a foster parent if that person or any adult residing in that person’s household was convicted of one of the following crimes during the preceding 5 years:
Simple assault
Aggravated assault in the fourth degree
A drug-related crime
Robbery in the second degree
Burglary in the third degree
If the division determines that an incident of child abuse or neglect by any household member has been substantiated, the application for licensure or renewal shall be denied. An exception may be made when it is determined that a foster child will not be endangered by remaining in the current foster home.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The home study shall include fingerprint-based State and Federal criminal history record checks for each prospective adoptive parent and each adult residing in the home. When the results reveal a criminal conviction, the agency shall examine the nature and seriousness of the crime and the date it occurred. Special attention shall be given to crimes of violence, crimes that involve the use or threat of a weapon, rape/sexual assault, crimes that result in the loss of life, and crimes against children. The circumstances of the crime, social conditions, and any evidence of rehabilitation will be considered.
The background checks shall be valid for 36 months. The cost of all criminal history record checks shall be paid by the prospective adoptive parent.
The records of the division regarding reports of child abuse or neglect shall be checked for the proposed adoptive parent and any household member age 18 or older for information that would raise a question of the suitability of the proposed adoptive parent or household member. The child abuse registry check shall be valid for 18 months.
A person shall not be eligible to adopt a child if that person or any adult residing in the household ever committed a crime that resulted in a conviction for:
A crime against a child, including endangering the welfare of a child, child pornography, child abuse, neglect, or abandonment
Murder or manslaughter
Aggravated assault in the second or third degree
Stalking
Kidnapping, criminal restraint, false imprisonment, interference with custody, criminal coercion, or enticing a child into a motor vehicle, structure, or isolated area
Sexual assault, criminal sexual contact, or lewdness
Robbery in the first degree
Burglary in the second degree
Domestic violence
Endangering the welfare of an incompetent person or an elderly or disabled person
Terrorist threats
Arson

New Mexico
Requirements for Foster Parents
Fingerprint-based nationwide criminal history record checks shall be conducted on all prospective foster parents and other adult relatives and nonrelatives residing in the prospective foster parent’s household. The department shall conduct a background check and shall submit the fingerprints to the Department of Public Safety and the FBI for this purpose.
In regulation: Abuse and neglect screens are conducted by licensing authority staff in order to identify those persons who pose a continuing threat of abuse or neglect to minors. An applicant shall be considered an unreasonable risk when he or she has:
A conviction for a offense involving moral turpitude that directly relates to whether he or she can provide a safe, responsible, and morally positive setting for a child
A conviction for an offense involving moral turpitude that does not directly relate to whether the applicant can provide a safe, responsible, and morally positive setting if the department determines that the applicant has not been sufficiently rehabilitated
A conviction, regardless of the degree or date of the crime, of trafficking in controlled substances, criminal sexual penetration, related sexual offenses, or child abuse
A substantiated referral, regardless of the date, for sexual abuse or for neglect characterized by a failure to protect against sexual abuse
There shall be a determination of unreasonable risk if a background check shows:
Pending charges for a felony offense, any misdemeanor offense involving domestic violence or child abuse, an arrest but no disposition for any such crime, or a pending referral with the department
An applicant is wanted for any offense by any law enforcement agency due to a warrant having been issued

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Fingerprint-based nationwide criminal history record checks shall be conducted on all prospective adoptive parents and other adult relatives and nonrelatives residing in the prospective adoptive parent’s household. The department shall conduct a background check and shall submit the fingerprints to the Department of Public Safety and the FBI for this purpose.
In regulation: Abuse and neglect screens are conducted by licensing authority staff in order to identify those persons who pose a continuing threat of abuse or neglect to minors.
The results of the Federal and State criminal records checks shall be sent to the department or a State agency authorized by law for such purposes. The department shall forward the results of the Federal and State criminal records checks to the requesting person and to the court if an adoption proceeding has been filed.

New York
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based criminal history records check is required for a prospective foster parent and any household member who is age 18 or older. An application for certification or approval of a prospective foster parent shall be denied where a criminal history record reveals a conviction for:
Child abuse or neglect
Spousal abuse
A crime against a child, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide
A felony conviction within the past 5 years for physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense
Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Dom. Rel. Law §§ 112; 115-d; Code of Rules & Regs. Tit. 18, § 421.27
Before making an order of adoption, the judge shall inquire of the Department of Social Services whether an adoptive parent is the subject of an indicated report filed with the statewide Central Register of Child Abuse and Maltreatment.
A fingerprint-based check shall be made for any existing criminal history record of the applicant. A petition for certification as a qualified adoptive parent shall be denied where a criminal history record reveals:
A felony conviction at any time involving:
Child abuse or neglect
Spousal abuse
A crime against a child, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, other than a crime involving physical assault or battery
A felony conviction within the past 5 years for physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense
In regulation: Notwithstanding a criminal conviction, an application may be approved if the applicant demonstrates that:
Such denial will create an unreasonable risk of harm to the physical or mental health of the child.
Certification of the applicant will not place the child’s safety in jeopardy and will be in the best interests of the child.

North Carolina
Requirements for Foster Parents
The department shall prohibit any individual from providing foster care if the individual has a criminal history. A fingerprint-based criminal history check must be conducted on all persons age 18 or older who reside in a licensed family foster home. The criminal history includes any county, State, and Federal conviction of a felony or pending felony indictment for:
A crime of child abuse or neglect or spousal abuse
A crime against a child, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, other than physical assault or battery
Physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense, if the offense was committed within the past 5 years
The fingerprints of all persons will be used to check the criminal history records of the State Bureau of Investigation and the FBI.
In regulation: An applicant is not eligible for licensure if he or she has, within the last 5 years, been substantiated for abuse or serious neglect and is placed on the Responsible Individuals List of the Central Registry, as defined in statute § 7B-311.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A fingerprint-based criminal history check must be conducted prior to placement on prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt a minor in the custody of the department and on all persons age 18 or older residing in the prospective adoptive home. The criminal history includes a county, State, or Federal conviction of a felony or a pending felony indictment for:
A crime of child abuse or neglect or spousal abuse
A crime against a child, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, other than physical assault or battery
Physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense, if the offense was committed within the past 5 years
In regulation: The agency shall conduct a preplacement assessment of a prospective adoptive parent. The assessment process must determine whether the applicant has ever been a respondent in a domestic violence proceeding or a proceeding concerning a minor who was allegedly abused, neglected, abandoned, or delinquent.

North Dakota
Requirements for Foster Parents
A criminal history records check is required for a prospective foster parent prior to approving a foster care license. Conviction of an offense does not disqualify a person from licensure unless the department determines that the offense has a direct bearing upon that person’s ability to serve the public as the operator of a facility or that, following conviction of any offense, the person is not sufficiently rehabilitated under §12.1-33-02.1.
In regulation: A family foster care applicant, family foster care provider, or members of the family foster care home must not have been found guilty of, pled guilty to, or pled no contest to:
Homicide
Assault, threat, or coercion
Kidnapping
Gross sexual imposition
Corruption or solicitation of minors
Sexual abuse of wards
Sexual assault
Robbery
Burglary, if a class B felony
Promoting sexual performances by children
Promoting prostitution or facilitating prostitution
Child procurement
Other offenses, if the department determines that the individual has not been sufficiently rehabilitated
The department will not consider a claim that the individual has been sufficiently rehabilitated until any term of imprisonment, probation, or parole has elapsed without a subsequent charge or conviction. An offender’s completion of a period of 5 years after final discharge or release from any term of imprisonment, probation, or parole, without subsequent charge or conviction, is prima facie evidence of sufficient rehabilitation.
In the case of a misdemeanor simple assault, the department may determine that the individual has been sufficiently rehabilitated if 15 years have elapsed after final discharge or release from any term of imprisonment, probation, or parole without subsequent conviction.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A criminal history records check is required for a prospective adoptive parent as part of the preplacement adoption assessment.

Northern Mariana Islands
Requirements for Foster Parents
Certification is required for prospective foster parents in order to ensure a safe, healthy, and moral environment for the juvenile. A criminal background check is not specified as part of the certification.
Requirements for Adoptive Parents
An investigation is required for a prospective adoptive parent to ascertain whether the adoptive home is a suitable home for the minor and whether the proposed adoption is in the best interest of the minor. A criminal background check is not specified as part of the investigation.

Ohio
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based criminal records check is required for a prospective foster parent and any person age 18 or older residing in the prospective foster parent’s home.
The department shall not issue a certificate authorizing a prospective foster caregiver to operate a foster home if the person or any person age 18 or older who resides with the prospective foster caregiver previously has been convicted of or pleaded guilty to any of the crimes listed in § 109.572(A)(8), unless the person meets rehabilitation standards established in rules adopted under § 2151.86(F).

The crimes listed include:
Murder, manslaughter, and assault
Kidnapping
Sexual offenses, including rape, sexual battery, prostitution, and child pornography
Endangering children
Domestic violence
Drug trafficking, illegal manufacture of drugs, and illegal cultivation of marijuana
If any person cannot prove that he or she has resided in Ohio for the past 5 years, an FBI national records check will be requested.
In regulation: Prior to placing the child with the relative or nonrelative substitute caregiver, the agency shall check the child abuse/neglect records for the prospective caregiver and others residing within the home.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A fingerprint-based criminal records check is required for a prospective adoptive parent and any person age 18 or older residing in the prospective adoptive parent’s home. If any person cannot prove that he or she has resided in Ohio for the past 5 years, an FBI national records check will be requested.
No probate court shall issue a decree of adoption if the person or any person age 18 or older who resides with the prospective adoptive parent previously has been convicted of or pleaded guilty to any of the crimes listed in § 109.572(A)(8), unless the person meets rehabilitation standards established in rules adopted under § 2151.86(F).

The crimes listed include:
Murder, manslaughter, and assault
Kidnapping
Sexual offenses, including rape, sexual battery, prostitution, and child pornography
Endangering children
Domestic violence
Drug trafficking, illegal manufacture of drugs, and illegal cultivation of marijuana

Oklahoma
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based State and national criminal background check is required for a prospective foster parent and any adult living in the home. A juvenile justice information system review is required for any child age 13 or older residing in a foster family home, other than the foster child, or who subsequently moves into the foster family home.
In regulation: Criminal history investigations must be obtained from the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation and the appropriate agency in the previous State of residence if the individual has resided in Oklahoma less than 1 year. The report must include a search of the sex offender registry and the child abuse registry. A confirmed allegation of child abuse or neglect is considered when evaluating the qualifications of the applicant and the safety and well-being of the children in foster care.
Individuals who are convicted of or enter a plea of guilty or no contest to certain crimes cannot be licensed to care for children, live in a family child care home, provide care for children, be a substitute or assistant caregiver, or be on the premises when children are in foster care. Those crimes include:
Violence against a person
Child abuse or neglect
Possession, sale, or distribution of illegal drugs
Sexual misconduct
Gross irresponsibility or disregard for the safety of others
Animal cruelty
A pattern of criminal activity

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A background check shall be required for adoptive parents and all other household members age 18 and older, consisting of a review of a national fingerprint-based criminal background check, a search of the Department of Corrections’ files maintained pursuant to the Sex Offenders Registration Act, and a search of the Child Abuse and Neglect Information System. For each adoptive parent or other household member age 18 or older who has not maintained continuous residency in the State for 5 years prior to the home study, a child abuse registry check shall be required from every other State in which the prospective adoptive parent or other adult household member has resided during that time.
In regulation: Reasons for denial may include, but are not limited to:
The applicant or any person residing in the home has a history of alleged or confirmed child abuse, neglect, or both.
The applicant or any person residing in the home has a history of arrests or convictions.
An application will be automatically denied for a felony conviction for any of the following offenses:
A crime involving violence including, but not limited to, rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but excluding physical assault or battery
Child abuse or neglect
A crime against a child, including, but not limited to, child pornography
A felony conviction for physical assault, domestic abuse, battery, or a drug-related offense within the previous 5 years period will result in denial of the application unless special approval is obtained from the court. The application is denied if the applicant has been convicted of a sex offense and subject to or married to or living with a person subject to the Oklahoma Sex Offenders Registration Act.

Oregon
Requirements for Foster Parents
A criminal records check is required for a prospective foster parent or relative caregiver and other individuals age 18 or older who will be in the household of the prospective foster parent or relative caregiver.
In regulation: An individual may not be approved or certified as a relative caregiver or foster parent, and no exception may be granted, if he or she has been convicted of a felony crime that involves:
Violence, including rape, sexual assault, and homicide, but not including other physical assault or battery
Intentional starvation or torture
Abuse or neglect of a child
Spousal abuse
Aiding, abetting, attempting, soliciting, or conspiring to cause the death of a child
Sodomy or sexual abuse
A child as the victim, including child pornography
Physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense within the preceding 5 years
A department manager is authorized to grant an exception when the applicant has been convicted of a crime other than one listed above, and it has been determined that the individual possesses the qualifications to be a relative caregiver or foster parent regardless of the criminal conviction. In determining whether to grant an exception, the person authorized to grant the exception shall consider factors such as the severity, nature, and circumstances surrounding the crime, the relationship of the criminal activity to the subject individual’s capacity to safely provide the proposed care, and any evidence of rehabilitation.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A criminal records check is required for a prospective adoptive parent and other individuals age 18 or older who will be in the household of the prospective adoptive parent.
In regulation: An individual may not be approved as an adoptive parent, and no exception may be granted, if he or she has been convicted of a felony crime that involves:
Violence, including rape, sexual assault, and homicide, but not including other physical assault or battery
Intentional starvation or torture
Abuse or neglect of a child
Spousal abuse
Aiding, abetting, attempting, soliciting, or conspiring to cause the death of a child
Sodomy or sexual abuse
A child as the victim, including child pornography
Physical assault, battery, or a drug-related offense within the preceding 5 years
A department manager is authorized to grant an exception when the applicant has been convicted of a crime other than one listed above, and it has been determined that the individual possesses the qualifications to be an adoptive parent regardless of the criminal conviction. In determining whether to grant an exception, the person authorized to grant the exception shall consider factors such as the severity, nature, and circumstances surrounding the crime, the relationship of the criminal activity to the subject individual’s capacity to safely provide the proposed care, and any evidence of rehabilitation.

Pennsylvania
Requirements for Foster Parents
In the course of approving a prospective foster parent, a foster family care agency shall require prospective foster parents and any individual over age 18 residing in the home to submit the following information:
A report of criminal history record information from the Pennsylvania State Police or a statement from the Pennsylvania State Police that the State Police Central Repository contains no such information relating to that person
A certification from the department as to whether the applicant is named in the central register as the perpetrator of a founded report of child abuse, indicated report of child abuse, founded report for school employee, or indicated report for school employee
In no case shall an application for foster care be approved where the department has verified that the applicant is named in the central register as the perpetrator of a founded report of child abuse committed within the previous 5 years. In no case shall a prospective foster parent be approved if any household member has been convicted of one or more of the following offenses:
Criminal homicide
Aggravated assault
Stalking, kidnapping, or unlawful restraint
Rape, sexual assault, indecent exposure, or incest
Concealing the death of a child
Endangering the welfare of children or dealing in infant children
Felony prostitution or pornography
Corruption of minors
Sexual abuse of children
Approval also shall be denied if a household member has been convicted of a felony drug-related offense in the previous 5 years.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The investigation of prospective adoptive parents and any individual over age 18 residing in the home shall include the following:
A report of criminal history record information from the Pennsylvania State Police or a statement from the Pennsylvania State Police that the State Police Central Repository contains no such information relating to that person
A certification from the department as to whether the applicant is named in the central register as the perpetrator of a founded report of child abuse, indicated report of child abuse, founded report for school employee, or indicated report for school employee
In no case shall an application for adoption be approved where the department has verified that the applicant is named in the central register as the perpetrator of a founded report of child abuse committed within the previous 5 years. In no case shall a prospective adoptive parent be approved if any household member has been convicted of one or more of the following offenses:
Criminal homicide
Aggravated assault
Stalking, kidnapping, or unlawful restraint
Rape, sexual assault, indecent exposure, or incest
Concealing the death of a child
Endangering the welfare of children or dealing in infant children
Felony prostitution or pornography
Corruption of minors
Sexual abuse of children
Approval also shall be denied if a household member has been convicted of a felony drug-related offense in the previous 5 years.

Puerto Rico
Requirements for Foster Parents
No person may provide care for children unless he or she has previously applied for and received a certification indicating that he or she is not registered in the registry of persons convicted of sex crimes and child abuse or has been convicted of any violent sex crime, child abuse, or any of the following felonies:
Murder, homicide, or incitement to suicide
Aggravated assault
Rape, seduction, sodomy, incest, or bestiality
Indecent exposure, obscene propositions, procurement, roguery, or carnal commerce
Restriction of liberty, kidnapping, or child abduction
Abandonment of a minor
Illegal deprivation of custody
Adoption in exchange for payment
Perversion of a minor
Public mendicancy by a minor
Theft, extortion, or imposture
Abuse against minors or disabled persons
Arson or devastation
The certification required shall be issued by the Puerto Rico Police. Police regulations may include the requirement of having applicants fill out a form with detailed personal information and providing their photograph and samples of their fingerprints.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A prospective adoptive parent must apply for and receive a certification indicating that he or she is not registered in the registry of persons convicted of sex crimes and child abuse, nor has he or she been convicted of any violent sex crime, child abuse, or any of the felonies listed above. A criminal record certificate of the prospective adoptive parent must accompany the adoption petition.

Rhode Island
Requirements for Foster Parents
The Department of Children, Youth and Families shall apply to the Bureau of Criminal Identification of the State police or the local police department for a fingerprint-based nationwide criminal records check of prospective foster parents. No license shall be issued to any person seeking to be licensed as a foster parent until the result of both the nationwide and statewide criminal record background check are forwarded to the department.
The department may authorize the placement of a child in a prospective foster home pending licensure for up to 6 months after the department has conducted a background check pursuant to § 40-13.2-3.1 and a statewide criminal record background check.
In regulation: Offenses that constitute disqualifying information are listed in the Code of Rhode Island Rules, and include:
Offenses against the person, including murder, manslaughter, kidnapping, sexual assault, felony assault, domestic assault, and felony child abuse
Offenses against the family, incest, child snatching, and exploitation for commercial or immoral purposes
Public indecency, including prostitution, pandering, circulation of obscene publications and shows, sale or exhibition to minors of indecent publications, pictures or articles, child pornography
Any felony drug offense

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A fingerprint-based nationwide criminal records check is required for a prospective adoptive parent as part of the adoption home study. The director of the Department of Children, Youth and Families will determine by rules and regulations those items of information appearing on a criminal records check that constitute disqualifying information because that information would indicate the prospective adoptive parent could endanger the health or welfare of a child or children.
In regulation: Offenses that constitute disqualifying information are listed in the Code of Rhode Island Rules, and include:
Offenses against the person, including murder, manslaughter, kidnapping, sexual assault, felony assault, domestic assault, and felony child abuse
Offenses against the family, incest, child snatching, and exploitation for commercial or immoral purposes
Public indecency, including prostitution, pandering, circulation of obscene publications and shows, sale or exhibition to minors of indecent publications, pictures or articles, child pornography
Any felony drug offense

South Carolina
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based FBI and State criminal history check is required for a prospective foster parent and any person age 18 or older who is residing in the prospective foster parent’s home. No child may be placed in foster care with a person:
Who has a substantiated history of child abuse or neglect
Who has pled guilty or nolo contendere to or who has been convicted of:
An offense against the person, as provided for in Chapter 3, Title 16
An offense against morality or decency, as provided for in Chapter 15, Title 16
Contributing to the delinquency of a minor
Assault and battery of a high and aggravated nature when the victim was a person age 17 or younger
Criminal domestic violence
A felony drug-related offense
In regulation: The following requirements shall be met prior to the issuance of a standard license to provide foster care:
Background checks shall be documented, including a review of abuse and neglect history, criminal history found with the State Law Enforcement Division and the FBI, and the Sex Offender Registry.
The applicant(s) cannot be considered for licensure if an applicant and/or any household member over age 18 has a substantiated history of child abuse and/or neglect, convictions of any of the crimes listed in § 63-7-2350, and/or is listed on the Sex Offender Registry.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A background investigation is required for the prospective adoptive parent to indicate whether the parent has any history of involvement with any proceeding concerning abused, neglected, or abandoned children.
In regulation: The following requirements shall be met prior to the approval of a preadoptive placement:
Background checks shall be documented, including a review of abuse and neglect history, criminal history found with the State Law Enforcement Division and the FBI, and the Sex Offender Registry.
The applicant(s) cannot be considered for licensure if an applicant and/or any household member over age 18 has a substantiated history of child abuse and/or neglect, convictions of any of the crimes listed in § 63-7-2350, and/or is listed on the Sex Offender Registry.

South Dakota
Requirements for Foster Parents
Before issuing a child welfare license, the department shall ensure that the child welfare agency has secured from an appropriate law enforcement agency a criminal record check to determine whether the applicant or any other person specified in § 26-6-14.4 (including any adult residing in the facility or any adult volunteer who provides care and supervision to children) has ever been convicted of a crime specified by the rules of the department.
In regulation: For those family foster home applicants seeking licensure from the department and those family foster homes licensed by the department, the department shall secure a criminal records check to detect convictions for:
Crimes that would indicate harmful behavior towards children
Crimes of violence as defined by § 22-1-2, or a similar statute from another State
Sex crimes as defined in State statutes chapter 22-22, or similar statutes from another State
Felony convictions for spousal abuse or drug-related crimes
The department shall screen a foster care applicant, family members, and other household members who are at least age 10 to determine if the individuals have been involved in any substantiated incidents of child abuse or neglect.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
No person may place a child in a home for adoption until a home study has been completed. A home study shall include a fingerprint-based criminal record check completed by the Division of Criminal Investigation and a central registry screening completed by the Department of Social Services.
In addition, no child who is in the custody of the Department of Social Services may be placed in a home for adoption until a fingerprint-based criminal record check has been completed by the FBI for each adopting parent.

Tennessee
Requirements for Foster Parents
Each person applying to work with children in any capacity shall complete a criminal history disclosure form and shall agree to release all records relating to his or her criminal history to the department for the purpose of verifying the accuracy of criminal violation information contained on the disclosure form. Such persons also shall submit to a fingerprint-based criminal history records check to be conducted through the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the FBI.
Conviction of an offense involving the physical, sexual, or emotional abuse of a child or any offense involving violence against a child or any person or an offense determined by the department to present a threat to the health, safety, or welfare of children shall disqualify the individual from employment that provides access to children.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A home study is required of a prospective adoptive parent to determine his or her suitability to adopt a child.
In regulation: The adoptive home study shall include the caseworkers’ evaluation of the applicants’ suitability as adoptive parents and recommendations as to approval of the home.

Texas
Requirements for Foster Parents
The department shall obtain criminal history record information for any person who is providing or applying to provide in-home or foster care for children in the care of the department and other persons living in the residence in which the child will reside.
Fingerprint-based criminal history background checks must be completed on all prospective foster parents and the members of their households who are age 14 or older and not in the legal conservatorship of the department. Criminal history background checks will be conducted in accordance with the criminal history rules promulgated by the Child Care Licensing Division of the department.
In regulation: Approval may be denied if the person has committed any of the following misdemeanor or felony offenses:
Offenses against the person or family
Robbery
Public indecency
Stalking
Criminal solicitation of a minor
Failure to stop or report aggravated sexual assault of a child
Any offense committed in the last 10 years under:
The Texas Controlled Substances Act
Making a firearm accessible to a child
Intoxication and alcoholic beverage offenses
Any other felony under the Texas Penal Code or any like offense under the law of another State or Federal law that the person committed within the past 10 years
Deferred adjudications covering an offense listed above if the person has not completed the probation successfully
Approval also may be denied if a check of the child abuse central registry reveals that the person has any sustained finding of child abuse or neglect, including sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect, neglectful supervision, or medical neglect.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The court shall order each person seeking to adopt a child to obtain his or her own criminal history record information. The court shall accept a person’s criminal history record information if the information was obtained not more than 1 year before the date the court ordered the history to be obtained.
Fingerprint-based criminal history background checks must be completed on all prospective foster and adoptive parents and the members of their households who are age 14 or older. Criminal history background checks will be conducted in accordance with the criminal history rules promulgated by the Child Care Licensing Division of the department.
In regulation: Approval may be denied if the person has committed any of the following misdemeanor or felony offenses:
Offenses against the person or family
Robbery
Public indecency
Stalking
Criminal solicitation of a minor
Failure to stop or report aggravated sexual assault of a child
Any offense committed in the last 10 years under:
The Texas Controlled Substances Act
Making a firearm accessible to a child
Intoxication and alcoholic beverage offenses
Any other felony under the Texas Penal Code or any like offense under the law of another State or Federal law that the person committed within the past 10 years
Deferred adjudications covering an offense listed above if the person has not completed the probation successfully
Approval also may be denied if a check of the child abuse central registry reveals that the person has any sustained finding of child abuse or neglect, including sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect, neglectful supervision, or medical neglect.

Utah
Requirements for Foster Parents
A child who is in the legal custody of the State may not be placed with a prospective foster parent unless, before the child is placed:
A fingerprint-based FBI national criminal history records check is conducted on the prospective foster parent and each adult living in the home.
The Department of Human Services conducts a check of the child abuse and neglect registry in each State where the prospective foster parent and each adult living in the home has resided in the previous 5 years to determine whether the prospective foster parent or other adult is listed as having a substantiated or supported finding of child abuse or neglect.
Each person required to undergo a background check passes the background check, as provided by § 62A-2-120.
The application of a prospective foster parent shall not be approved if he or she has been convicted of a felony involving conduct that constitutes any of the following:
Child abuse
Commission of domestic violence in the presence of a child
Abuse or neglect of a disabled child
Endangerment of a child
Murder, manslaughter, child abuse homicide, or homicide by assault
Kidnapping
A sexual offense
Sexual exploitation of children
Aggravated arson, burglary, or robbery
Domestic violence
A prospective foster parent shall not be approved if, within the previous 5 years, he or she has been convicted of a felony involving conduct that constitutes any of the following:
Aggravated assault, aggravated assault by a prisoner, or mayhem
A violation of the Controlled Substances Act, Drug Paraphernalia Act, Imitation Controlled Substances Act, Controlled Substance Precursor Act, or Clandestine Drug Lab Act

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The preplacement adoptive evaluation shall include:
Criminal history record information regarding each prospective adoptive parent and any other adult living in the home, prepared by a law enforcement agency based on a fingerprint criminal history check, no earlier than 18 months immediately preceding placement of the child
A report prepared by the Department of Human Services containing all information regarding reports and investigations of child abuse, neglect, and dependency with respect to each prospective adoptive parent and any other adult living in the home, obtained no earlier than 18 months immediately preceding placement of the child
A child who is in the legal custody of the State may not be placed with a prospective adoptive parent unless, before placement of the child:
A fingerprint-based FBI national criminal records check is conducted on the prospective adoptive parent and each adult living in the home.
The Department of Human Services conducts a check of the child abuse and neglect registry in each State where the prospective adoptive parent has resided in the 5 years immediately preceding the day on which the prospective adoptive parent applied to be an adoptive parent, to determine whether the prospective adoptive parent is listed in the registry as having a substantiated or supported finding of child abuse or neglect.
The department conducts a check of the child abuse and neglect registry of each State where each adult living in the home of the prospective adoptive parent has resided in the immediately preceding 5 years, to determine whether the adult is listed in the registry as having a substantiated or supported finding of child abuse or neglect.

Vermont
Requirements for Foster Parents
For prospective foster parents, the commissioner may obtain from the Vermont Crime Information Center the record of convictions of that person. The commissioner shall first notify the person whose record is being requested.
The owner or operator of a facility licensed or registered by the department may ask the commissioner for the record of convictions and the record of substantiated reports of child abuse of a current employee or a person to whom the owner or operator has given a conditional offer of employment.
In regulation: The State licensing authority may require any person in the household or any person who provides care and supervision to foster children on a regular basis, whether or not that person is an applicant or licensee, to submit references and to provide such other information as the State licensing authority may deem necessary. A license may be denied if a foster parent or any member of the household:
Has been charged with or convicted of a criminal offense
Has current, unresolved problems with alcohol or other chemicals
Has abused or neglected a child

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
The commissioner of the Department for Children and Families or any judge of the probate court shall obtain from the Vermont Criminal Information Center the record of Vermont convictions and pending criminal charges for any person being evaluated to be an adoptive parent.
The record of convictions and pending criminal charges of the appropriate criminal repositories in all States in which there is reason to believe the applicant has resided or been employed also shall be obtained.
A national criminal history record check shall be requested from the FBI. The request to the FBI shall be accompanied by a set of the applicant’s fingerprints and a fee established by the Vermont Criminal Information Center that shall be paid by the applicant and shall reflect the cost of obtaining the record from the FBI. The Vermont Criminal Information Center shall send to the requester any record received pursuant to this section or inform the requester that no record exists.

Virgin Islands
Requirements for Foster Parents
Criminal background and registry checks are not addressed in statute or in regulation.
Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Criminal background and registry checks are not addressed in statute or in regulation.

Virginia
Requirements for Foster Parents
Foster parents and any adults residing in the home shall undergo background checks prior to approval. Background checks require:
A criminal history record check
A search of the central registry for any founded complaint of child abuse and neglect
Conviction of a “barrier crime” shall disqualify an applicant. “Barrier crime” includes:
Murder or manslaughter
Malicious wounding
Abduction for immoral purposes
Assaults and bodily wounding
Robbery, burglary, or carjacking
Threats of death or bodily injury
Felony stalking
Sexual assault
Arson
Drive-by shooting
Use of a machine gun or sawed-off shotgun in a crime of violence
Pandering, crimes against nature involving children, incest, or taking indecent liberties with children
Abuse and neglect of children or failure to secure medical attention for an injured child
Child pornography
Abuse and neglect of incapacitated adults
Delivery of drugs to prisoners
Any felony violation relating to possession or distribution of drugs
A foster home also may be disqualified for:
A conviction of any other felony not listed above unless 5 years have elapsed since conviction
A founded complaint of child abuse or neglect
A child-placing agency may approve as a foster parent an applicant who has been:
Convicted of not more than one misdemeanor not involving abuse, neglect, or moral turpitude of a minor, provided 10 years have elapsed following the conviction
Convicted of statutory burglary for breaking and entering a dwelling, home, or other structure with intent to commit larceny, who has had his or her civil rights restored by the Governor, provided 25 years have elapsed
Convicted of felony possession of drugs who has had his or her civil rights restored by the Governor, provided 10 years have elapsed

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Adoptive parents and any adults residing in the home shall undergo background checks prior to approval. Background checks require:
A criminal history record check
A search of the central registry for any founded complaint of child abuse and neglect
Conviction of a “barrier crime” shall disqualify an applicant. “Barrier crime” includes:
Murder or manslaughter
Malicious wounding
Abduction for immoral purposes
Assaults and bodily wounding
Robbery, burglary, or carjacking
Threats of death or bodily injury
Felony stalking
Sexual assault
Arson
Drive-by shooting
Use of a machine gun or sawed-off shotgun in a crime of violence
Pandering, crimes against nature involving children, incest, or taking indecent liberties with children
Abuse and neglect of children or failure to secure medical attention for an injured child
Child pornography
Abuse and neglect of incapacitated adults
Delivery of drugs to prisoners
Any felony violation relating to possession or distribution of drugs
An adoptive home also may be disqualified for:
A conviction of any other felony not listed above unless 5 years have elapsed since conviction
A founded complaint of child abuse or neglect
A child-placing agency may approve as an adoptive parent an applicant who has been:
Convicted of not more than one misdemeanor not involving abuse, neglect, or moral turpitude of a minor, provided 10 years have elapsed following the conviction
Convicted of statutory burglary for breaking and entering a dwelling, home, or other structure with intent to commit larceny, who has had his or her civil rights restored by the Governor, provided 25 years have elapsed
Convicted of felony possession of drugs who has had his or her civil rights restored by the Governor, provided 10 years have elapsed

Washington
Requirements for Foster Parents
A fingerprint-based background check through the Washington State Patrol Identification and Criminal History Section and the FBI is required when the department seeks to approve an applicant for a foster placement.
In regulation: A background check is required for any individual who will have unsupervised access to children, including a person who is at least age 16 residing in a foster home or relative’s home who is not a foster child.
The department must review records of criminal convictions and pending charges, child protective services case files for founded reports of child abuse or neglect, and any civil judgments, determinations, or disciplinary board final decisions of child abuse or neglect. The department also must check the following for each person age 18 and older residing in the home:
Child abuse and neglect registries in each State a person has lived in the previous 5 five years
Washington State Patrol and FBI fingerprint-based background checks regardless of how long the person has resided in Washington
A conviction for any of the crimes listed will permanently prohibit a person from being licensed. Those felony convictions include:
Child abuse and/or neglect
Spousal abuse
A crime against a child, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including other physical assault
The department must disqualify a person from licensure if it has been less than 5 years from a conviction for the following crimes:
Any physical assault not included above
Any sex offense not included above
Any felony conviction not included above
A felony violation of certain drug-related crimes, including unlawfully manufacturing, delivering, or possessing a controlled substance with the intent to deliver, or unlawfully using a building for drug purposes

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
All preplacement reports shall include a background check of any conviction records, pending charges, or disciplinary board final decisions of prospective adoptive parents. The background check shall include a fingerprint-based background check of national crime information databases for any person being investigated. The background check shall include a review of the child abuse and neglect registries of all States in which the prospective adoptive parents or any other adults living in the home have lived during the previous 5 years.
In regulation: The department must conduct Washington State Patrol and FBI fingerprint-based background checks for each person age 18 and older residing in the home, regardless of how long the person has resided in Washington. A conviction for any of the crimes listed will permanently prohibit a person from being approved. Those felony convictions include:
Child abuse and/or neglect
Spousal abuse
A crime against a child, including child pornography
A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including other physical assault
The department must disqualify a person from approval if it has been less than 5 years from a conviction for the following crimes:
Any physical assault not included above
Any sex offense not included above
Any felony conviction not included above
A felony violation of certain drug-related crimes, including unlawfully manufacturing, delivering, or possessing a controlled substance with the intent to deliver, or unlawfully using a building for drug purposes

West Virginia
Requirements for Foster Parents
The secretary shall prescribe forms and reasonable application procedures including, but not limited to, fingerprinting of applicants and other persons responsible for the care of children for submission to the State police and, if necessary, the FBI for criminal history record checks.
Before a home registration is granted, the secretary shall investigate all persons responsible for the care of children for compliance with standards including criminal and child abuse or neglect history of persons present in the home while children are in foster care.
In regulation: For licensure as a foster parent, the following are required prior to approval:
All adult household members shall complete a Criminal Identification Bureau record form that is fingerprint-based and a Statement of Criminal Record form.
All adult household members shall complete a Statement of Child Abuse or Neglect History form and a signed release of information authorizing the department to verify the information.
An agency shall not approve a home for foster care in which a household member has any convictions other than minor traffic violations. Special circumstances may allow a waiver to be granted by the secretary.

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
A criminal background check may be required for a prospective adoptive parent to determine his or her suitability as an adoptive parent.
In regulation: For certification for an agency adoption, the following are required prior to approval:
All adult household members shall complete a Criminal Identification Bureau Record form that is fingerprint-based and a Statement of Criminal Record form.
All adult household members shall complete a Statement of Child Abuse or Neglect History form and a signed release of information authorizing the department to verify the information.
An agency shall not approve a home for adoption in which a household member has any convictions other than minor traffic violations. Special circumstances may allow a waiver to be granted by the secretary.

Wisconsin
Requirements for Foster Parents
The following is required for licensure as a foster parent or treatment foster parent:
A criminal history search from the records maintained by the Department of Justice
Information from the registry for reporting client abuse maintained by the Department of Public Health
Information maintained by the Department of Regulation and Licensing regarding the status of the person’s credentials
Information maintained by the department regarding any substantiated reports of child abuse or neglect against the person
The department may not license, continue, or renew the license of a foster home or treatment foster home if the department knows or should have known any of the following:
The person has been convicted of a serious crime.
There has been a finding that the person has abused or neglected any client or misappropriated the property of any client.
A determination has been made that the person has abused or neglected a child.
A serious crime includes:
Homicide, reckless homicide, or felony murder
Battery
Sexual assault, sexual exploitation, or incest with a child
Physical abuse or neglect
Soliciting a child for prostitution
Possession of child pornography
Child abduction

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
An investigation is required of a prospective adoptive parent to determine whether the prospective adoptive parent’s home is suitable for the child. If the petitioner was required to obtain an initial license to operate a foster home or treatment foster home before placement of the child for adoption, the agency making the investigation shall obtain a criminal history search from the records maintained by the Department of Justice and request a fingerprint-based check of the national crime information databases with respect to the petitioner.
If the petitioner was required to obtain a license to operate a foster home or treatment foster home before placement of the child for adoption, the agency making the investigation shall obtain information maintained by the department regarding any substantiated reports of child abuse or neglect against the petitioner and any other adult residing in the petitioner’s home. If the petitioner or other adult residing in the petitioner’s home is not, or at any time within the 5 years preceding the date of the search has not been, a resident of this State, the agency shall check any child abuse or neglect registry maintained by any State or other U.S. jurisdiction in which the petitioner or other adult is a resident or was a resident within those 5 years for information that is equivalent to the information maintained by the department regarding substantiated reports of child abuse or neglect.
In regulation: The adoption home study for a special needs child may include a check of police records and Department of Justice criminal records.

Wyoming
Requirements for Foster Parents
This issue is not addressed in statute. The following information is from the Code of Wyoming Rules.
Licensure of family foster homes requires documentation from at least one of the following:
Inspection and/or investigation reports
Protective services reports and/or police reports
Arrest and/or conviction records
Mental health, medical, or treatment reports
Department of Family Services field office files
Reasons for the denial, revocation, or suspension of certification include, but are not limited to:
Any staff being convicted of an act of child abuse, neglect, or sexual offense, or being the subject of a substantiated abuse or neglect investigation
Any staff being convicted of a crime against children, including a misdemeanor
Any staff being convicted within the preceding 5 years of any felony classified as an offense against the person or family, public indecency, or the Wyoming Controlled Substance Act

Requirements for Adoptive Parents
Each petitioner shall file an affidavit with the adoption petition that states:
All felony convictions of the petitioner within the preceding 10 years
All misdemeanor convictions of the petitioner within the preceding 5 years
The current parole or probation status of the petitioner, if any
In regulation: When so ordered by the court, the department shall conduct an adoption home study. Information that may be required for the study includes criminal history checks, psychological evaluations from a licensed psychologist, and central registry checks.

Sources: this report was written with material obtained from The Child Welfare Information Gateway, in the US.



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How To Know If Someone Needs To Get a Criminal Background Check Report

Having a criminal background check report ran on someone has become a requirement in many high security positions today. This isn’t only due to the rapid climbing of crime rates, but also to better find out what level of trust any person is worth of.

Nowadays, people feel more at ease knowing more details about a person before conducting business with them.

If a particular job post must be filled with someone who has to offer a high level of trust, a criminal background check will certainly be able to show anything dubious that might otherwise jeopardize such a job.

In the United States, public records are kept updated on various levels, i.e. local, state and federal by different law enforcement agencies, and several databases are maintained for each level of government.

Locally, sheriff and police departments and agencies keep their public records up-to-date, as well as state police, state patrols, and correctional facilities, who make sure theirs are kept current on a state level.

Most court records may be released or made available to the public, including background investigation reports. They are often circulated between various law enforcement agencies to better help them check the people they are dealing with. Such background check reports usually show facts from past jobs, criminal records, arrests, misdemeanors, adoption findings and suspects involved in any prosecutions or investigations (if applicable).

Thus, it can quickly be realized why getting a criminal background check report should never be underestimated. Nowadays, one does not have to believe everything is told about a person and take it for face value. By having an instant background check performed online, here at Investigations123.com, it’ll be easier to make a rational decision as to whether a person can be trusted (or not) by someone else. Important facts will surface that will help in making sound decisions.

Caretakers, potential employees, tenants, dates are just a few groups of people who may need that a history of their backgrounds be brought to light.

Essentially, the criminal background check is designed to reassure peace of mind for those who make the inquiry, online. 

As an employer, a criminal background check ran on potential employees helps to end possible problems in the workplace. A criminal background check ensures that you aren’t filling a job post with someone who has a criminal record with serious offences.

Search Nationwide Criminal Records

Conduct Criminal Background Checks. You'll get a 5-day risk-free trial for just $1, here.



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Criminal Records: Definition, Nature and Types (risk-free trial)

Criminal records describe offenders and offenses and can include offender fingerprint identification and notations of arrest and subsequent dispositions.
Accurate, timely and complete criminal history record information enables States to instantly identify persons who are prohibited from firearm purchase or are ineligible to hold positions of responsibility involving children, seniors, or the disabled; enables criminal justice agencies for making decisions on pre-trial release, career criminal charging, determinate sentencing, and correctional assignments; is crucial to help law enforcement officials in criminal investigations and decision making; and, is necessary for criminal record checks for national security, employment, licensing and related economic purposes, as required under recent legislation.

Conviction Records
These criminal records contain information indicating that an individual has been found guilty of a criminal offense, has gotten a lower than honourable discharge out of the military, or has been put on probation, parole, or imprisoned by any police force agency or military body.

Arrest Records
These criminal records contain facts about individuals, like the type and description of the offense, dates of disposition and conviction, sentence imposition, photos, along with other information.

Inmate Records
Reports on people with imprisonment stays inside a U.S. Federal or State prison and their parole and probation reports, including active or inactive status. These reports detail the offense, time period of sentence, release date, as well as other additional criminal records data.

Misdemeanors
Crimes of a lesser nature than felonies very often result in a jail sentence of fewer than twelve months, penalties under $2000, and/or community service.

Felonies
Crimes covering a multitude of offenses for instance armed robberies, assaults, drug sales and possession, and murders.

Sex Offender Listings
From the late 90’s, individual states enacted Megan’s Law which made information accessible to the public concerning the F.B.I.’s national sex offender registry. Online criminal records checks will disclose the names of men and women on the registry.

Parole Violations
The failures of people on parole to follow along with the conditions of their release from prison in an important respect.
Only people serving a jail sentence for that commission of a felony offense meet the criteria for parole.

Probation Violations
The failures of people on probation to follow along with the conditions of their probation in an important respect.
Probation, as opposed to local jail time or a prison sentence, exists for individuals found guilty of felonies and misdemeanors and who’re not considered threats to the public.

Traffic Violations
Violations that are of a serious nature, for example those resulting in a death, will be included within one’s criminal records history for most states.

How can I get a copy of my criminal background report and my own criminal record?

A person’s criminal record is an official record for any criminal offence when they have been arrested or found guilty of a crime.
Even traffic violations can come under criminal offenses in some states.
Unless you receive a pardon or are expunged, the entry will continue to be on your record and may appear whenever there’s a background criminal check.
Sometimes you may even forget the violation which happened many years back.
Hence it will become necessary for the individual himself/herself to check on your own personal criminal record so that they will know what arises when someone wishes to research your criminal charges and convictions in past times.
You might need a background check when purchasing a gun and you may need a background check to work alongside children as well as to turn into a volunteer fire fighter.
You might also need to know the length of time a background check takes or how you can do a background check to examine previous employers.
Their are lots of reasons and methods to perform a background check on people online.
You will need to initially collect all your details, your own personal information and official documents like birth record, driver’s license, passport etc.
You can go to your state government’s website, call any local police station and / or sheriffs office.
You may also visit the FBI’s website to do a fingerprint nationwide criminal history check.
Different states might have different background check procedures.
The clerk or the person in charge should be able to tell you what you should do.
Once you know your criminal case and possess the right information you can just request the office to provide you with a copy of your criminal history.
You will have to make a request for a background check and fill out an application as well.
If your offense is more than ten years, you will need to contact the Department of State.
You can obtain a copy of your background history with the FBI too.
Nowadays you’ll be able to obtain every piece of information online by inputting your name and state in a search engine, and also take a print out of the results [Investigations 123 com will provide you with all such info. to you via our 5-day risk-free trial].

Just how do I find someone’s arrest records online?

There could be instances when you have to find out if someone has long been arrested or to search people’s arrest history online.
To find out specifics of someone’s arrests or criminal charges online you need to first find the correct name and spelling of the individual whose arrest record you’re searching, not his shortened name.
There might be several people with similar names however, if you’ve got his / her address or personal information like birth date, it becomes easier.
Visit your local or state government website that can give you access to all the information you need.
Arrest records of whether or not the offense is traffic, theft, robbery, murder, violent, business or alcohol and drug related offenses will likely be shown. Just typing in a person’s name in a search engine will fetch you the details.
Basic details are shown but additional information needs to be paid.
Information is not at all difficult to obtain but if you want a hard copy or an attested one, you may have to go the appropriate office and get one.
Anyway, it’s much easier and convenient to search for public criminal arrest records and find out the details of someone’s arrest record online via Investigations 123 com’s 5-day risk-free trial, here at this site.

Criminal Background Screening

Get your Criminal Record 5-day Risk-Free Trial Report, Today. Please search here.



Investigate 123 Public Records

Background Investigations 123 com

These online services provided here, at Investigations123.com can help you if you think you have a cheating mate.
Whether you are trying to cope with your partner’s current affair, or are trying to reconcile with a cheating mate, or you suspect infidelity, in the situations described below, Investigations123.com can help you in finding the facts.

• Your mate has been receiving or making suspicious phone calls and you want to prove who the phone number belongs to and the identity of the person your spouse is cheating with. Our reverse phone  search could help you.

• You want personal information or additional details about the person your spouse is cheating with. Our online  background check report could help you.

• You want to find out if your spouse’s lover has enough assets to make it worth your efforts to sue for alienation of affection. An online comprehensive background check could help you.

• You are trying to reconcile with a cheating mate and you wish to prove whether he / she is still communicating with their ex-lover behind your back. A reverse phone look-up search and a reverse e-mail search could help you.

• Your spouse is receiving or sending incriminating e-mails and you want to know who the e-mail address belongs to. A reverse e-mail search could help you.

• You want to know where your spouse’s lover works or lives. An online background check search could help you.

• You want to know the marital status of the person your mate is seeing behind your back. An online background check search about vital records could help you.

• You want to prove the facts about whether the person your spouse has gotten involved with has a criminal background or not. An online criminal background check search could help you.

• You’ve found unfamiliar or suspicious phone numbers in your partner’s cell phone bill, or among his / her personal belongings, and you want to prove who those numbers belong to. Again, a reverse phone look-up search could help you.

All types of investigation services described above can be accessed from your own computer / laptop / smartphone, in the privacy of your own home.

All of them are completely confidential, and unless you tell someone, no one will ever find out you’ve checked such person out, at Investigations123.com.

Our online background investigation services are also being used by law enforcement, government officials, lawyers, private investigators and many others.

Unrestricted access to State and Federal Records, here.

Instantly Access State and Federal Records, without restrictions. Unlimited lookups and accurate reports. Instantly view and print all your records. Get complete background investigation services, online!



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Online Investigation Reports

There are certain times in our lives, and certainly when we are parents, that we may need to do some detective work.  Many parents have experienced a situation where their child is spending lots of time with someone new.  It could be just a feeling or even a parent’s intuition that gives clues that something is wrong.  It might be a new roommate for your older child who gives you an eerie feeling, or something else altogether.  Whatever the situation, there are times when you just don’t feel right about someone who is a new acquaintance of your child.

As a parent, you feel you have to take action and do something about it, but you don’t want to become the snooping parent! What do you do in a situation such as this?

Many parents feel they should stay out of their child’s private life when they reach the age of 18.  However, they struggle with the worry that comes with being a parent.  It’s difficult to weigh the safety of your child (when you’re not really sure if they’re in danger) against their privacy.  There is no one authority when it comes to a situation like this, but if the feeling you have is so strong that you are truly worried about your child, you do have options for safeguarding his/her best interests.

Perhaps talking to your child would provide you with the information you need to feel better or to stop worrying.  Often, children will share their feelings with their parents, but sometimes they won’t.  Sometimes a parent feels forced to find things out by themselves.  With recent advances in online search technology, all you need is the name of that person you feel strange about it, in order to find out tons of information about him/her.

Here at our homepage (Investigations123.com’ search box) you can simply type in just a name (on its own or with additional information you might have) in order to receive a comprehensive report about the background of such person.

You can find out if that person has ever been convicted of a crime.  It’s difficult to imagine your child might be spending time with a criminal, but it might happen. If that’s the case, chances are your child is not even aware of it.  You can find out other information as well, such as whether or not that person has ever been convicted in a civil court case.  The odd feeling you have right now about the new acquaintance of your child might be something to do with a possible dishonest person or someone who may be trying to take advantage of your child.

The greatest advantage of conducting an online investigation search is the fact that your child or the other person will never know you conducted the search.  It’s completely confidential, and no one will ever know that you looked up for a comprehensive background report, online.

Simply by typing in the person’s name, you can even find out if they are married, if they’ve ever filed for bankruptcy, and much, much more.

As a parent, sometimes you have to tell yourself to let your child live his / her life.  But sometimes, being proactive and taking action may end up saving your child’s future life.  If you need to conduct detective work, you can check out Investigations123.com and get the relevant information you need in a matter of seconds.  You may be surprised with what you’ll find out.  You may also become relieved, but most of all you’ll be ensuring the safety of your child, and after all, that’s a parent’s duty, right?

Search background criminal records

How to do a background investigation, online, via a 5-day risk-free trial.



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Background Checks Free Trial: Video, here.

Types of Free Trial Background Checks / Investigations Searches about People, Phones, and Email Addresses.

Watch more videos, by visiting our YouTube video channel, here.

 
Remember, when you order Investigations 123.com search services, you get a Free Trial Background Check, State and Nationwide Criminal Records, Marital Status, Phone Numbers, Date of Birth, Address History, Neighbors, Neighborhood Info, Alias Names, Sex Offender Check, Possible Deceased Records, Relatives and Associates, Property Information, Liens, Bankruptcies and Judgments and many more Court documents. Start with a 5-day risk-free trial at Investigations 123 People Search.



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Used by Private Investigators – Unlimited Access to Premium Databases With Over 1 Billion Records!

Unlimited People Search Free Trial

Please check here your 5-day risk-free trial for unlimited people search and background checks.

—-> Please check here the menus / user interfaces, which you can expect to get inside your membership’s area.

—-> You can also conduct here preliminary unlimited people searches and background checks, before you decide to start your 5-day free trial.

Criminal Records UNLIMITED SEARCH: NATIONWIDE & STATE CRIMINAL RECORDS
Background Check UNLIMITED SEARCH: INSTANT BACKGROUND CHECK REPORT
Search Warrants / Arrest Records UNLIMITED SEARCH: Instantly search INMATE RECORDS
Search Warrants / Arrest Records UNLIMITED SEARCH: WARRANT and ARREST RECORDS
Felony / Misdemeanor Records
UNLIMITED SEARCH: FELONY and MISDEMEANOR RECORDS
Sex Offenders
UNLIMITED SEARCH: Find SEX OFFENDERS in your neighborhood
Court Cases Records UNLIMITED SEARCH: Research COURT CASES RECORDS criminal convictions
Criminal Records UNLIMITED SEARCH: Instantly lookup CRIMINAL RECORDS online
Sex Offenders by Zip Code UNLIMITED SEARCH: Lookup SEX OFFENDERS by zip codes
Reverse Phone Lookup UNLIMITED SEARCH: Get REVERSE PHONE number reports.
Potential Dates / Neighbors UNLIMITED SEARCH: Screen POTENTIAL DATES and NEIGHBORS
Family History UNLIMITED SEARCH: Complete FAMILY HISTORY research & reports.
Real Estate Property Records UNLIMITED SEARCH: Instantly lookup REAL ESTATE property records
Full date of birth and age
UNLIMITED SEARCH: Find out FULL DATE OF BIRTH and AGE
Lost People: family, friends, relatives UNLIMITED SEARCH: Look for LOST PEOPLE, family, friends, relatives.
Background Checks on Potential Dates UNLIMITED SEARCH: Instantly Background Checks on POTENTIAL DATES
Find Classmates and Relatives UNLIMITED SEARCH: Find OLD FRIENDS, CLASSMATES and RELATIVES
Property Records and Address History UNLIMITED SEARCH: PROPERTY RECORDS and ADDRESS HISTORY


Considering a criminal background check or people search, online? You’ll save time and money from physical background searches. Besides, Private Investigators fees are very expensive, and other alternatives often offer incomplete or inconclusive results. Still, you need to find criminal background information for your own livelihood and safety. The right solution is an online, instant criminal background check for finding out who you’re really dealing with.
You’ll get answers to your questions on a person’s background from the best industry and governmental information directories in existence.
Investigations 123 search results are comprehensive and complete, derived from updated information resources of governmental and private search listings, and are specialized in our four informative options: people search, background checks, criminal records, and social media.
What’s more, you can stay abreast of changes in these records through your membership access to our state-of-the art public records search system. —> Start now by selecting your 5-day risk-free trial, here.

With Investigations 123’s background checking services, you’ll gain instant access to millions of criminal, sex offender, and other public records that can expose neighbors, new acquaintances, and personal service providers who might have a criminal background. Then, you’ll have the ability to use such information for making more informed decisions about the people you associate with (online or offline), on a daily basis.

With over 1 billion records, Investigations 123 instant nationwide search system allows for unlimited look ups and accesses data from multiple databases to compile the most comprehensive reports available. And our Background Check Report Search combines a multitude of various records such as civil judgments, bankruptcies, liens, court cases, search warrants, as well as federal / criminal records to give you a Comprehensive, Unlimited Background Check Records Report. Please grab your free trial, here.





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Unlimited Arrest Records Searches

Find out what others know about you!

Who Is Checking Your Background? Check DUI (Driving Under The Influence) Records, Here!

Who Is Checking Your Background?
Credit Card and Insurance companies are known to check your automobile record once a year – or at the very least, they check once every 3 years.  When you’re applying for a brand-new insurance policy, it’s certain they’ll check. Every now and then tickets, accidents, and drunk-driving convictions can escape your insurer’s attention. However, if your Insurance company  does  find out about a DUI (Driving Under The Influence) conviction, you’ll see higher insurance rates and possibly even find yourself looking for a new insurance company, due to them not renewing your existing policy for your motor vehicle.

There are 2 ways insurance companies generally handle customers with a DUI conviction. Firstly, your insurance company may cancel your policy. In other instances, they’ll raise your premiums by increasing your point count, almost to a situation of  unaffordability.

Along with insurance companies, there are many other individuals who can easily lookup your past and come to pre-determined judgments. You should not allow this to happen. Simply lookup your public past records by conducting a free search, here. Be the first to know and don’t be shocked. Furthermore, you’re also entitled to a request information removal and get peace of mind.

Access Public Records from Your Own Home

Investigations123.com, a recognized and trusted online records information provider, lets you use a network of multiple data sources to find the exact records you’re looking for including Criminal Driving Violations. Data is captured from thousands of sources, private and public, conveniently and quickly right to your computer screen.  We provide a fast and discreet way for you to find records with direct online data retrieval, here.

Your search will include fields dependant on your particular lookup category and subject. Each individual report is included in your 5-day free trial. 

Your Public Records Search Results may include:

  • Full Court Records Check:  Courthouse & DUI Files
  • 20 Year Address History with Phone Numbers and Details
  • National Arrest & Court Warrants
  • National Federal & State Tax Liens
  • National Federal & Civil Judgments
  • National Federal & State Bankruptcies
  • Distinguishing Bodily Marks
  • List of Relatives with Addresses
  • Roommates and Associates
  • Age/Date of Birth
  • Alias/Maiden Name
  • Possible Neighbors
  • Property Ownership
  • Marriages/Divorces
  • Death Index Check
  • Work Licenses

With membership, you’ll get access to records of all types.  Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to check a potential employee’s driving records before you hire them?  Your unlimited membership will allow you to get access to this information, including DUI’s, driving offenses, and reverse license plate lookups.

Isn’t it important for you to make sure the babysitter / nanny you’ve chosen for your kids is who she says they are?  Your membership will allow you to feel comfortable with your choice by giving you the ability to run instant background checks, bankruptcy reports, criminal histories, and public records. Please check it here.

Wouldn’t you like to know a little more about that guy that gave you his number at the club last night before you call him up?  Access the reverse lookup system here and find out more using a cell phone, landline, or email address. See if you got a fake name or if he’s got any DUI’s.

Practically anything except for the very sensitive personal information such as credit card and financial data, including passwords and full account numbers, is available about anyone. Other than that, you might be able to uncover a lot of information about mostly anyone. Social Security numbers are among the sensitive personal information that is generally not available. It is a vital security precaution not to allow Social Security numbers be available public.

You’ll be able to lookup information about people in the United States and Canada – we have the most databases and data centers available for both countries. Also, we have the most public data of any provider on the internet.  

Please enter your name or the name of whoever you’re researching into the correct input form here, to begin with your preliminary people search.



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Menus Screenshots for Subscribers

As soon as you subscribe your 5-day risk-free trial, you’ll be able to conduct all sorts of searches in the members’ area, in accordance with the following menus (main screenshots are provided below):

  • Background Check Searches

  •  Criminal Records Search
  •  Phone Look Up

  • People Look Up
  • Vital RecordsVital RecordsVital Records

 Vital Records

Please note: searches for vital records will not provide official certificates or documents of any kind.

  • Email Look Up

  • Property Records
  • Relative Search
  • Deep Web Search
  • Asset Search
  • Neighborhood Check

Search for neighbors in your local area

  • Reverse IP Address
  • Business Search by Name, Phone and Owner
  • Unclaimed Money Search

Click here to subscribe your 5-day risk-free trial @ Investigations 123 com



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Social Media Background Checks

In a world which is becoming more and more digitized, about 45 percent of employers are starting to use social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to screen potential employees, as per this article published on Mindflash.com.

However, not all Facebook-related employment decisions are necessarily negative, as Mindflash.com shows in the image below.

Using social media to hire and fire employees

You’ve probably noticed that 18 percent of employers have found relevant information that has actually facilitated their decision to hire the job applicant.

Still, finding something unusual or odd is quite common, as more and more companies use what they found out on social networking sites to bar job applicants.

Of those surveyed in the study, 35 percent of employers were reported to have found content in social media sites that cause them not to hire a candidate for a job opening.

Nowadays, already-hired employees are watching carefully to what is on their facebook pages and/or tweets.

That’s why our Deep Web Search tool is becoming more and more popular, because it’s an easy way of locating important information about people and checking their social media contacts.

You’ll be able to scan the internet to find photos, videos, blogs, professional interests, social networking profiles, archives and publications and more.

The Deep Web Search tool is included in your 5-day risk-free trial. Order here, today.



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DUI / DWI Criminal Records: FAQ

Driving under the influence (driving while intoxicated, drunk driving, drinking and driving) is the act of operating any vehicle after consuming alcohol or other drugs. DUI or DWI are synonymous terms that represent the criminal offense of operating a vehicle while being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

DUI means Driving Under the Influence and a prosecutor must prove that the driver was impaired by alcohol, even if they didn’t reach the legal blood alcohol content of the state.

DWI means Driving While Intoxicated, and is typically more serious, because it means the driver was caught driving at or over the legal limit.

People can still get a license with DWI convictions, but their driver’s license will likely be restricted to only work or court-approved driving.

Getting a DWI is considered a common crime – and a mistake made by lots of people at some point in their life.
However, DWI convictions can be a major red flag for other people, particularly potential employers. You should keep track of your DWI records to see what other people are finding out about you, while searching for public records.

Make sure your DUI or DWI record isn’t making you look bad, keep track of your public records online.

Why – you might ask? Well, your family and friends will probably forgive you, but it’ll be much harder to give a good first impression with a DWI or DUI hanging over your head – especially at job interviews.
A routine background check, even an online public record search will bring up your DUI / DWI record.
You might be denied jobs – even non-driving jobs — because having a DWI could make you look irresponsible in the eyes of potential employers.
And with the popularity of online background checks, even new friends or dates could be judging you on your criminal record without you being aware of.  Investigations123.com offers you a 5-day risk-free trial, here.

A sample report is provided below…

Comprehensive Criminal Background Check Sample Report

Comprehensive Criminal Background Sample Report



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