Criminal Background Checks For Job Screening Purposes (free trial)

Criminal Background Checks For Employment / Job Screening Purposes (risk-free trial)

Recently, criminal background checks became a key part of the job screening process, both to exclude unsuitable (or even dangerous) employees, as well as to help in hiring the best possible candidate. But the whole procedure of obtaining a proper background check is full of shortcomings that vary in each state and/or county.

The optimal background check should be precise, comprehensive, consistent, instant (when obtained online) and, of course, legal.

Coordinating all these factors is normally very time-consuming, and the work performed differs in accordance with the location of the job applicant and where he/she has lived in the past.

As a result of the fact that the whole background check screening process is unregulated, employers that don’t know how to test a proper screening process may end up with a criminal background report that is both inaccurate, and incomplete.

Most employers routinely conduct background checks on job applicants as part of the hiring process.

Increased usage of criminal background checks by employers to prequalify job applicants arises from the growth of legal claims suggesting that an employer was negligent in hiring an employee who later engaged in workplace violence or some other act that might result in theft of company’s property or sexual assault to a colleague at work.

The fact that negligent hiring is so common (particularly among smaller organizations with fewer resources) greatly increases an employer’s exposure for large damages claims, making the use of criminal background checks a great defense to liability, in case violence might occur in the workplace.

Furthermore, many organizations are also conducting criminal background checks on current employees, either on a routine basis or prior to a transfer, promotion or any change in the terms and conditions of employment.

Employers utilizing  background checks for employment purposes must adhere to a number of legal requirements before they can use a criminal background check on an employee or job applicant.

Prior to obtaining a background check, the employer must make a very clear written disclosure to the job applicant that a background check may be obtained, and such disclosure can’t be incorporated into an employment application.

The employer must also get the written authorization of the job applicant to ask the background check report. However, an employer is entitled to refuse hiring any applicant who won’t complete such written authorization.

What’s Included in a Criminal Background Check?

The restrictions on an employer considering criminal histories for employment purposes are driven primarily by state law.

The state law restrictions on the use of criminal background check information for employment purposes are as diverse as the number of states in the USA.

The federal and state enforcement agencies seem to be balancing the proven effectiveness of utilizing background check information in making hiring decisions against the potential for a disparate impact on minorities.

Furthermore, arrest records are subject to the principle of innocent until proven guilty, whereas conviction records, by definition, are adjudications of guilt. Thus, the state agencies favor employment decisions based on criminal convictions (and not arrest records) because the offense has been objectively confirmed. As a result, employers are on much safer grounds relying exclusively on criminal convictions when making hiring decisions.

A comprehensive criminal background check involves accessing many sources of information.

The federal database doesn’t contain date of birth or Social Security Number (SSN) information, making an exact match difficult for individuals with common names. Date of birth and full name are the most common identifiers, but driver’s license numbers and SSN may be retrieved as well.

Because common names may pull up records for a number of different individuals, it’s important that employers ask job applicants to provide full names (including middle), maiden names and any other names used in the past. For the same reason, job applicants should provide home addresses going back as many years as will be searched.

Counties are the source of criminal information, and therefore, they generally have the most comprehensive criminal background information.

County records generally contain information about felonies, misdemeanors, infractions, and traffic violations in addition to arrests.

Such records are available to the public and generally go back at least twenty years, but it’s unlawful for employers to use all such information (e.g. arrest records) in the job screening process.

Depending on the county, a search may be performed online or in person, either by a court clerk or a private individual.

State databases of criminal information are compiled from the underlying county criminal background history data. Thus, state databases rely on local jurisdictions to report criminal information. And such reporting can be infrequent or inconsistent, and not all levels of offenses are reported.

State law determines what types of records will be transmitted from the counties to the state criminal databases. Such records include felonies, misdemeanors, infractions, traffic violations, arrests, cases without disposition, expunged records, and even juvenile records.

As with county courthouses, searches may be performed online or in person, depending on the state.

Unlike county records, which are in the public domain, states own and keep up their own criminal databases, and state laws may restrict access to various types of records. The entire criminal history is available based on information that is considered publicly accessible pursuant to that state’s laws.

Premium databases: these are privately owned databases of criminal background information maintained by companies such as Investigations123.com and made available online to users via an initial risk-free trial.

Thus, there is no such thing as a one-stop comprehensive source (i.e., an all-inclusive national database) for criminal background information, as there are many sources – some are public, others private.

Criminal background screening for employment purposes should not be conducted lightly. Background check screening is a process that implicates a broad variety of privacy and safety concerns that people attribute great value.

Ideally, employers who seek criminal background check information want to be able to make informed decisions about whether a job applicant will contribute to a safe and productive workplace or potentially will cause some harm to a colleague or company’s property, if eventually employed.

Investigations123.com is not a consumer reporting agency as defined under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”), and the information in the databases has not been collected in whole or in part for the purpose of furnishing consumer reports, as defined in the FCRA – which includes Criminal Background Check Reports.

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Criminal Background Check: How To Know If Someone Needs To Get One

How To Know If Someone Needs To Get a Criminal Background Check Report

Having a criminal background check report ran on someone has become a requirement in many high security positions today. This isn’t only due to the rapid climbing of crime rates, but also to better find out what level of trust any person is worth of.

Nowadays, people feel more at ease knowing more details about a person before conducting business with them.

If a particular job post must be filled with someone who has to offer a high level of trust, a criminal background check will certainly be able to show anything dubious that might otherwise jeopardize such a job.

In the United States, public records are kept updated on various levels, i.e. local, state and federal by different law enforcement agencies, and several databases are maintained for each level of government.

Locally, sheriff and police departments and agencies keep their public records up-to-date, as well as state police, state patrols, and correctional facilities, who make sure theirs are kept current on a state level.

Most court records may be released or made available to the public, including background investigation reports. They are often circulated between various law enforcement agencies to better help them check the people they are dealing with. Such background check reports usually show facts from past jobs, criminal records, arrests, misdemeanors, adoption findings and suspects involved in any prosecutions or investigations (if applicable).

Thus, it can quickly be realized why getting a criminal background check report should never be underestimated. Nowadays, one does not have to believe everything is told about a person and take it for face value. By having an instant background check performed online, it’ll be easier to make a rational decision as to whether a person can be trusted (or not) by someone else. Important facts will surface that will help in making sound decisions.

Caretakers, potential employees, tenants, dates are just a few groups of people who may need that a history of their backgrounds be brought to light.

Essentially, the criminal background check is designed to reassure peace of mind for those who make the inquiry, online.

As an employer, a criminal background check ran on potential employees helps to end possible problems in the workplace. A criminal background check ensures that you aren’t filling a job post with someone who has a criminal record with serious offenses.

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Criminal Background Check Reports: FAQ

Criminal Background Check Reports @ Investigations 123 com

A criminal record is a record of a person’s criminal history, but the information included in a criminal record varies between states, and counties.

Criminal records may include traffic offenses such as drunk-driving and speeding, and conviction records where the person has been declared guilty by an US court, or simply pleaded guilty.

Conviction records include a wide array of offense degrees such as misdemeanor and felony offenses.

Here at Investigations123.com we match criminal records to your subject based on the search criteria you’ve entered in your preliminary search.

Key information about a person’s criminal conviction records like the nature of the crime, the offense date and the reporting institution will be listed, record by record. However, the amount of information included in a criminal record will vary according to its sources.

Your subject-matter might have several criminal records and you’ll have the ability to show or hide any specific record.

In order to give you the best instant access to relevant criminal records, we will preselect criminal records that exactly match your search criteria and present them to you. However, in order to be comprehensive in our results, our database also returns records that aren’t necessarily a complete match, but contain enough matching elements that might be relevant for your current search. We’ll allow you to choose if you want to add them to the profile on the current subject or create a new profile on a different person – if you might wish to keep the records separately.

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Are you being refused jobs because of criminal records that show up under your name?
Even if you are sure that you’ve never been arrested or convicted for any crime, employers might still find criminal records when they search for your name. You see, thousands of American citizens share the same name and employers aren’t always able to distinguish among them. That’s why checking your own criminal records is so important – it’ll prevent accidental mix-ups and it’ll allow you to verify what will show up out of your real past.

Investigations123.com will offer you the following 3 options:

  1. National Sex Offender Reports,
  2. Single State Criminal Reports, and
  3. National Criminal Reports.

Criminal record information is collected from a variety of federal, state and county public records, including departments of corrections, departments of public safety, county courts, state dockets, sex offender registries, Federal and Appellate court dockets, Supreme Court and County dockets, municipal jurisdictions, federal fugitive files, federal and state courts, supreme courts, small claims courts, family courts, appeals courts, district courts, traffic courts, state and county criminal record repositories, prison parole and release files, probation records, records from other state agencies and Interpol public records.

If you are searching for criminal records only, you will not receive reports on police records or arrest records.

Traffic Offenses: normally, the only traffic offenses that show on a criminal record would be serious offenses such as hit and run violations, or driving under the influence.

Misdemeanors: usually considered a minor offense, the misdemeanor is a crime punishable by incarceration, typically in a local jail. The most incarceration period is usually limited to less than twelve months.

Felonies: these offenses are considered more serious than the previous two categories. Typically, a felony carries a penalty of incarceration from one year to life in a state prison, up to the death penalty.

Crime is an act or omission that the law makes punishable. It can also be the breach of a legal duty, which is treated as the subject of a criminal proceeding. There are serious and less serious crimes. However, common law recognizes only two classes of crimes – serious crimes (or felonies) and minor crimes (or misdemeanors).

Crime (or criminal) record is the summary of a person’s contacts with law enforcement agencies, and provides details of all arrests, convictions, sentences, parole violations, dismissals and not guilty verdicts committed by any person. Furthermore, information about height, weight, eyes, hair color, identifying marks, possible different names used by such person, possible different dates of birth, different social security numbers used, fingerprint classification, race, and state and federal identification numbers of the person are also provided.

A court is a governmental body consisting of one or more judges who adjudicate disputes and administer justice by law. The room in which a law court sits is called a court room.

Each State will have a court system for the territory under its control, and will have a Supreme Court which is the highest court of appeal in that State.

Besides Supreme Courts, there are also appellate courts, district courts, probate courts, juvenile courts, family courts, the court of common pleas, small claims court, etc.

Besides the state courts, there are also the federal courts (i.e. US Supreme Court, US Courts of Appeals, US District Courts, and Bankruptcy Courts).

When searching for criminal records, you’ll be able to distinguish 3 types:

1. Infraction is subject primarily by state laws, but is not considered a criminal offense, and a fine is typically imposed on those found guilty of an infraction.

2. Misdemeanor is an offense for which a sentence to a term of imprisonment not exceeding 12 months might be imposed. It is punishable by fine or imprisonment in a city or county jail. Misdemeanors are tried in the municipal, police or justice courts. Typical misdemeanors include disturbing peace, petty theft, simple assault, drunkenness in public, drunk driving without injury to others, various traffic violations, and public nuisances.

3. Felony is an offense for which a sentence to a term of imprisonment in excess of one year is involved, and are serious crimes (e.g. murder, rape, burglary). The sentence for a felonious crime under state law will be served in a state prison.

Conduct Criminal Background Checks, and Search Nationwide Criminal Records at Investigations 123 com. You’ll receive a special 5-day risk-free trial. Check it here.

Search Nationwide Criminal Records
Conduct Criminal Background Checks. You’ll get a 5-day risk-free trial. Check it here.